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2018 Covention

MSHA Convention Program

Thursday Sessions
Friday Sessions
Saturday Sessions
Sunday Sessions

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Thursday

7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Session 1 - Round Robin

This informal session will allow presenters and attendees to converse and interact on topics related to research or clinical practice in speech-language pathology or audiology. Presenters will speak for 10-15 minutes on a research or clinical topic within their scope of expertise and allow 5-10 minutes of discussion and questions among the attendees.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to restate two main points from the presenter’s ideas or research, cite two resources for further research on the topics presented and articulate one way they could apply this new research or clinical practice in their work setting.

Level of Learning: Introductory

8:15 pm - 9:15 pm

Session 2 - Ask MSHA

This session will utilize a panel discussion format comprised of MSHA Executive Board members and ASHA Advisory Council to focus on issues and trends impacting the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology including reimbursement, legislation at state and federal levels, graduate level training programs, state licensure requirements and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s (DESE) implementer model. Panel members will detail how these issues directly impact the practices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and will provide information as to how actions at the local, state and national levels can influence change. Participants will be given an opportunity to ask questions and to contribute to the discussion.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the history of Missouri licensure and certification requirements related to the schools, identify at least three issues impacting service delivery and list pending legislation impacting our professions at both a state and national level.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Friday

8:00 am - 11:30 pm

Session 3 - Short Course - Improving Language and Literacy Outcomes for Individuals Who use AACt

This short course will be repeated as Session 11.

Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

Children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies often struggle to develop functional literacy skills. In recent years, researchers have focused on methodological approaches to literacy assessment and intervention for this population with promising results. In general, improvements in language and literacy skills have been noted when intervention focused on multiple linguistic strategies in environments that emphasized active engagement in authentic tasks. As language experts, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) play an important role as part of collaborative teams that help children who use AAC acquire emergent and conventional literacy skills. Knowledge of the relationships between all language domains and how these support conventional literacy skill development is essential to achieving positive outcomes. Ensuring that AAC systems support the continuum of literacy skill acquisition is challenging, but critical. The purpose of this short course is to familiarize participants with a wide range of evidence-based literacy assessment and intervention methods useful for working with children who require AAC. Specific strategies will be presented along with the opportunity to practice in a hands-on AAC lab environment with a variety of AAC devices. Participation is limited to 30 individuals to allow adequate time to practice during the hands-on portion of the course.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the literacy challenges that individuals who use AAC experience, summarize recent research evidence related to effective literacy instruction for individuals who use AAC, describe specific strategies to promote literacy development for children who use AAC and create literacy interventions using AAC technologies.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:00 am - 4:30 pm

Day Institute - Modern Medical Speech Language Pathology: It’s all About the Disease

James Coyle, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, University of Pittsburgh

The aerodigestive tract is the upper part of the respiratory and digestive systems, serving physiologic functions first (including swallowing) and communications functions second. It is not the speech mechanism, swallowing mechanism or vocal tract. So understanding the normal and pathological physiologic function of both halves of the aerodigestive system is crucial to the selection of intuitive and appropriate diagnostic procedures and management plans in patients with communication and swallowing disorders caused by pulmonary and digestive diseases, artificial airways, iatrogenic disorders following cardiothoracic and other procedures and neurological conditions. This day institute will explore the structure and function of the respiratory and digestive systems, the effects of pulmonary diseases on breathing and swallowing and how digestive diseases, particularly esophageal conditions, produce dysphagia symptoms, as well as how they are evaluated and what the test results mean. We will review the differential diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia, the effects of health on human physiology, how to identify risk factors for dysphagia-related adverse outcomes (with a focus on pneumonia) in adults in acute and intensive care units and discuss various common forms of dysphagia treatment, updating long standing knowledge of their effects with more recent evidence.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the ventilatory and respiratory roles of the respiratory system, describe respiratory and deglutitive interactions in the aerodigestive tract, differentiate between aspiration- and other etiologies of pneumonia and other common respiratory conditions through medical record evidence and explain what the diagnoses of common esophageal pathologies mean and how they might lead to dysphagia symptoms.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Session 4 - AAC: Fostering Emergent Literacy

Amanda Hettenhausen, MAR, CCC-SLP, Saltillo Corporation

Research indicates 90% of people using alternative or augmentative communication (AAC) enter adulthood without acquiring functional literacy skills, yet research also tells us everyone can read and write. How do we bridge this gap? This session will help participants understand the foundation and development of literacy. Participants will learn research-based strategies to foster emergent literacy skills for individuals who use AAC, specifically, related to providing shared reading, making reading materials accessible, engaging in early writing activities and supporting early phonological awareness skills. A variety of materials and a demonstration of tools within the Chat Software will be shared, giving participants ideas to get started fostering emergent literacy.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the relationship between reading, writing, listening and communicating, identify components of emergent literacy, apply techniques for developing emergent literacy skills for individuals who use AAC and list available tools to support literacy development for individuals who use AAC.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 5 - Genetics and Hearing Loss

Gerald Schaefer, MD, University of Arkansas

Hearing loss has multiple etiologies. Not surprisingly, genetic factors are some of the more common known causes. In addition gene-environment interactions influence the expression of the hearing loss. This session will focus on identifying the specific etiology of hearing loss in persons with hearing impairments. We will discuss the genetic cause, associated medical conditions and familiar implications. We will review the causes of hearing loss in context of pathogenesis (i.e. what mechanism is affected). This will set the frame work for possible therapies in the future. Finally we will discuss the role of the geneticist in an HI team. We will talk about the interactions of audiologists and speech-language pathologists as we share common patients. We will outline how to evaluate these families so that they are prepared in anticipation of the referral for genetic evaluations.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to recognize common genetic mechanisms that can affect hearing, analyze the tiered process in the genetic evaluation of hearing loss and identify the primary reasons for a referral for genetic evaluation.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Session 6 - Educational Planning: For Students With Cochlear Implantss

MaryAnn Kinsella-Meier, AuD, CCC-A; Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

Professionals and parents of students with cochlear implants are faced with determining the best educational placement for their child. The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center and the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program at Boston Children's Hospital partnered to develop guidelines to support educational planning. Teachers, speech-language pathologists, audiologists, allied professionals and parents of students who have a clinical instructor are faced with determining the best placement, services and accommodations necessary to assure that the child has appropriate access to school-wide curriculum. Unfortunately, there is a paucity in the available resources that help foster these important discussions and considerations. This free, comprehensive tool, Student's With Cochlear Implants: Guidelines for Educational Planning, provides professionals and parents with essential information on how to best facilitate discussions regarding educational planning needs of each student with a cochlear implant, regardless of educational setting or communication modality.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the type of students who can benefit from this tool, analyze the importance of discussing educational placements, support services and the other variables critical to promoting educational success, discuss the varied educational placements, support services and variables critical to promoting educational success for students using cochlear implant technology and explain the components of the appendices and other resources contained with the guidelines and how they can be beneficial to their work.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Session 7 - Out of the Dark With LAMP: Four AAC Case Studies

Amanda DeBord, MS, CCC-SLP, St Louis Public Schools; Gretchen Bright, BS, Prentke Romich Company

Follow the one-year journey of the language acquisition through motor planning (LAMP) approach of four students in the public school setting. LAMP is a therapeutic approach based on neurological and motor learning principles. The goal is to give individuals who are nonverbal or have limited verbal abilities a method of independently and spontaneously expressing themselves in any setting through the use of augmentative and alternative communication ( AAC). The students who will be featured are of varying age and language skill set. Participants will view videos and data logging demonstrating student progress. Each case study will highlight baseline skills and behaviors, the implementation strategies used, obstacles encountered and acceptance levels of the teams.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify and describe three effective practices while teaching AAC, ascertain three strategies for overcoming obstacles with staff and students and analyze four profiles using the language data logging website.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 8 - Practical Applications for the Assessment and Treatment of Multilingual Populations, Part 1

Abby Eubank, MS, CCC-SLP; Sarah Sosland, MA, CCC-SLP, from Children's Mercy Kansas City

The process of completing a comprehensive speech-language evaluation for children who are multilingual or monolingual non-English speakers involves collecting, synthesizing and reporting information about functional communication skills in a descriptive manner. This differs from the evaluation process commonly used when standardized scores are applicable. Additionally, there are specific implications for treatment and strategies that have been shown to be more effective when working with this population and their families. The key elements of these processes, including guidelines for working with interpreters, tools for adapting to cultural differences and resource guides that promote best practice, will be discussed. The presenters will provide ways to implement this information in daily speech-language pathology practice.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify two similarities between monolingual and multilingual language development, identify two resources to help them modify services provided to culturally and linguistically diverse children and families and identify two limitations of standard scores.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 9 - School Services Update

Pat Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Liberty Public Schools; Beth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District; Diane Cordry Golden, PhD, Missouri Council of Administrators of Special Education; Sharon Sowder, MA, CCC-SLP, Ozarks Medical Center

The purpose of this session is to inform the MSHA membership with respect to proposed and/or new standards and the impact on speech-language pathologists working in the school setting. The new eligibility criteria for language impairment and sound system disorder will be reviewed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the current language impairment and sound system disorder criterion, describe the changes with the new language impairment and sound system disorder criterion and list changes with eligibility criterion regarding voice and fluency disorder.

Level of Learning: Introductory

1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Session 10 - Student Technical Sessions Part 1
1:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Session 11 - Improving Language and Literacy Outcomes for Individuals Who use AAC

Repeated from Session 3.

Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

Children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies often struggle to develop functional literacy skills. In recent years, researchers have focused on methodological approaches to literacy assessment and intervention for this population with promising results. In general, improvements in language and literacy skills have been noted when intervention focused on multiple linguistic strategies in environments that emphasized active engagement in authentic tasks. As language experts, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) play an important role as part of collaborative teams that help children who use AAC acquire emergent and conventional literacy skills. Knowledge of the relationships between all language domains and how these support conventional literacy skill development is essential to achieving positive outcomes. Ensuring that AAC systems support the continuum of literacy skill acquisition is challenging, but critical. The purpose of this short course is to familiarize participants with a wide range of evidence-based literacy assessment and intervention methods useful for working with children who require AAC. Specific strategies will be presented along with the opportunity to practice in a hands-on AAC lab environment with a variety of AAC devices. Participation is limited to 30 individuals to allow adequate time to practice during the hands-on portion of the course.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the literacy challenges that individuals who use AAC experience, summarize recent research evidence related to effective literacy instruction for individuals who use AAC, describe specific strategies to promote literacy development for children who use AAC and create literacy interventions using AAC technologies.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Session 12 - Genetics and Communication Disordersp

Gerald Schaefer, MD, University of Arkansas

Audiologists and speech pathologists encounter many patients with some form of communication disorder, either as a primary diagnosis or as an associated secondary condition. Communication and social-communication disorders have a strong genetics component to them. Determining the genetic cause can be extremely helpful for the patients and their families and the professionals that work with them. A genetic answer can identify the cause, determine the prognosis, provide recurrence risks and know about associated (co-morbid) medical conditions. In this session, we will review what is known about the genetics causes of communication disorders. We will discuss what is involved in the genetic evaluation of them and when to refer for evaluation.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to understand the genetic basis of communication disorders, recall the components of a genetic evaluation and recognize the benefits to families of a genetic evaluation.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

3:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session 13 - Empowering the SLP in School-Wide Positive Behavior Support

Heather Hatton, PhD, University of Missouri; Deanna Maynard, NBCT, Missouri Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support; Laura Frye, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri, Columbia

Significant and inappropriate student behavior poses a formidable challenge for any practitioner. Chronic, low level inappropriate behaviors (e.g., blurting out, fidgeting, etc.) also impede effective intervention practices in therapy and prevent successful generalization of new skills into classroom settings (Lewis, Hatton, Jorgenson and Maynard, 2017). Increasingly, schools implement school-wide positive behavior interventions and supports (SWPBIS), or multi-tiered systems of support to improve behavioral and academic outcomes for all students. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) typically receive little formal training in these systems prior to encountering team collaboration in the field. There is a communicative nature of problem behavior that school-based SLPs are positioned to facilitate if they understand the functional relationship between the behavior and the learning environment(s)(Lewis, Mitchell, Harvey, Green and McKenzie, 2015). Effective school-based SLPs should be able to readily identify inappropriate student behavior(s) and assist the student in learning appropriate replacement behavior(s) in the therapy room and collaborate with the classroom teacher to ensure the replacement behaviors generalize to inclusive settings. The purpose of this session is to increase the SLP’S understanding of the utility of SWPBIS, promote SLP knowledge, practice as viable SWPBIS team members and empower SLPs to implement effective, evidence-based practices for managing and changing inappropriate student behaviors.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to discuss function of behavior in terms of antecedent, behavior and consequence, complete a behavior pathway and develop a summary statement, connect effective classroom/therapy room practices to the function of the behavior and identify replacement behaviors and communication skills.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 14 - Living the ICF Model: Patient's Perspective

Greg Turner, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Joni Turner, MS

As speech-language pathologists (SLPs), we consistently come in contact with a variety of patients exhibiting conditions that are chronic in nature. Chronic illness can directly and indirectly influence many of the domains found with the SLP's scope of practice. This can range from the pharmacological treatments to the inability to cope with the disorder. Fortunately, only a small minority of our colleagues actually live the experience of chronic disease. The purpose of this session is to gain understanding from a fellow colleague who has dealt with a chronic infectious disease over the last 10 years. This disease has led to chronic pain and chronic fatigue. It also resulted in a permanent disability. Her lived experiences from a professional perspective will provide participants with a unique understanding of factors important to both the assessment and treatment process.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to recall the application of the international classification of functioning model to chronic pain and chronic fatigue, identify the influence the nature of chronic pain and/or chronic fatigue and the medical treatment have on cognitive and linguistic skills and identify steps they will take in their practice to improve care for the patients they work with who exhibit chronic pain and/or chronic fatigue.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 15 - Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets: How Does it Work?

Amy Clark, MS, CCC-SLP, PROMPT Institute

Prompts for restructuring oral muscular phonetic targets (PROMPT) is a philosophy approach system and technique that helps clients reach their full potential. This session will describe the multidimensional philosophy and application principles. In addition, current and past PROMPT research studies will be reviewed. Interactive case studies will highlight how PROMPT is applied in assessment and treatment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the philosophy and application principles of PROMPT, list and explain PROMPT research and identify key components of PROMPT assessment and treatment.

Level of Learning: Introductory

4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session 16 - Mentoring and Supervision of Young Professionals: Strategies and Resources

Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University; Beth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City Schools; Patricia Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Liberty Public Schools Franklin Elementary

The purpose of the session is to facilitate discussion on mentoring and supervision strategies related to various work settings, including documentation, licensure, ethical issues and other areas that impact the entry-level professionals and supervisors. During this session, the project titled, MSHA Mentoring Young Professionals Program (MMYP) will be discussed. MMYP is intended to nurture our graduate students and entry-level professionals by cultivating the culture of mentoring. The program provides mentoring services to graduate students as well as clinical fellows via web-based meetings, webinars and face-to-face roundtable meetings at the Convention. Finally, specific strategies will be discussed to ensure successful work in school settings. Strategies for mentoring will also be addressed along with resources.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to demonstrate an understanding of practice issues in school settings as well as other employment settings, identify specific strategies to achieve their professional and personal goals and locate and gather information/resources on mentoring.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Session 17 - Poster Presentations -Part 1
Saturday

7:00 am - 8:00 am

Session 18 - Poster Presentations - Part 2
8:30 am - 10:00 am

Session 19 - Cognitive Rehabilitation: Therapy...Therapy...Therapy!, Part 1

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

The United States is facing a situation without precedent: more than 16 million people in the United States today are living with cognitive impairments and the World Health Organization estimates more than 30 million by the year 2050, with less and less people to care for them. Successful cognitive rehabilitation to improve, maintain or reversing cognitive deficits is crucial for everyone's quality of life, patient, family and caregiver! In this innovative session, you will receive 101 evidence-based techniques, strategies and interventions for all levels of cognitive impairment. Whether a patient presents with a mild or severe cognitive impairment, this session teaches which approach to take and which path of interventions to pursue. You will be presented with techniques that will change the brain's neuroplasticity, as well offer compensatory strategies or enhance a patient’s procedure memory. This session offers evidence-based and time-tested treatment techniques and options. It will emphasize the importance and effectiveness of creating highly individualized treatment strategies and provides attendees with the needed skills to choose and adapt techniques into tailored, personalized therapy plans. Active case studies are examined and participants are encouraged in the session to design a patient profile with therapy interventions and goal documentation.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to use evidence-based techniques, strategies and interventions for all levels of cognitive deficits, determine cutting-edge therapy interventions utilizing state-of-the-art memory techniques designed to change the brain's neuroplasticity and apply meaning to everyday therapeutic tasks, increasing patient participation, engagement and functional outcomes.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 20 - Setting Language in Motion: An Early Intervention Resource

MaryAnn Kinsella-Meier, AuD, CCC-A, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

This session will focus on evidence-based, practical information addressing topics integral to the identification process and intervention opportunities for infants and their families. A review of the critical components necessary to promote early language acquisition as well as tips on how this information can be used effectively with families and service providers will be highlighted. Based on a collaborative effort between the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center and the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program for Boston Children’s Hospital, a free web-based resource has been developed to meet this need. Setting language in motion is designed for early intervention providers, educators of deaf children, early childhood specialists, speech-language pathologists, audiologists, allied professionals, parents and other caregivers. Seven modules are available in American sign language, English and Spanish. Parent interviews, videos of audiologic testing, downloadable resources as well as activity guide sheets are all components of this free resource.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify information contained within the seven modules that can be shared with families to support early intervention needs, identify at least two concepts they can use in their work with families in early identification and intervention, develop an understanding of the information contained within these modules and apply how the activity sheets and downloadable resources can be incorporated into their work.

Level of Learning: Introductory

8:30 am - 10:30 am

Session 21 - Academically Able and Autism

Shannon Locke, MS, CCC-SLP; Terri Carrington, MA, CCC-SLP, from MSU/MO-DESE - Project ACCESS

You may have students who are identified as having autism, either educationally or medically, but are considered high functioning and have not met eligibility for significant academic services. However, these students still struggle, especially with social communication and executive functioning skills. While these students with autism may be academically able, they demonstrate deficits impacting their overall educational performance, including their ability to socialize and be successful post-secondary in gaining employment and becoming contributing citizens and good neighbors. This session will focus on identifying these students, their needs and suggestions for effective educational programming for them.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to analyze the impact of autism on educational performance and preparing for post-secondary life beyond the academic skills needed to make the grade, recognize non-standardized measures to assess and identify the needs of individuals with autism that are able to perform content area skills academically, yet lack the necessary soft skills for independence and employment and list contributing components that collectively make up an individuals’ soft skills and identify specific strategies to support development of these soft skills in students with autism receiving minimal to no special education minutes.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 22 - Difficult Conversations

Lisa Goran, PhD, CCC-SLP; Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A; Melissa Passe, MA, CCC-SLP; Andrea Richards, MA, CCC-SLP; Janet Gooch, PhD, CCC-SLP; from Truman State University

In today's professional climate, the speech-language pathologist (SLP) and audiologist are often faced with the task of initiating and conducting difficult conversations with a variety of individuals as they relate to myriad factors including classroom/clinic performance, job performance, knowledge and skill acquisition, interpersonal abilities and their future success in their given position. This session will spend some time identifying the context in which these conversations are likely to occur, strategies for successfully communicating about these issues to the best possible satisfaction of all concerned and the importance/necessity of tracking and sharing the results of these conversations with all relevant parties.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify warning signs that a difficult conversation is imminent, identify strategies used to navigate through a difficult conversation across a variety of contexts and analyze the tracking process to ensure communication following the difficult conversation is recorded appropriately for possible future legal issues

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 23 - MSHA's Town Hall Meeting with ASHA Liaison

Janet Deppe, MS, CCC-SLP, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association; Beth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District

Service delivery in the fields of audiology and speech-language pathology is constantly evolving. Professionals working in education settings, healthcare settings and in universities are experiencing dramatic changes as government spending and healthcare and education policies are changing at the national and state levels. Join us for a town hall-style conversation with our American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) liaison. Changes in education and healthcare will be discussed, as well as their impact on members of MSHA and the consumers of our services. Attendees will have the opportunity to share their issues and concerns, as well as their expectations from ASHA in this changing landscape.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list several recent changes to the education/healthcare policy that will affect their practice, describe the impact of these changes to their practice and earn strategies for adapting to change in order to improve outcomes for their clients.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 24 - Practical Applications for the Assessment and Treatment of Multilingual Populations, Part 2

Abby Eubank, MS, CCC-SLP; Sarah Sosland, MA, CCC-SLP, from Children's Mercy Kansas City

The process of completing a comprehensive speech-language evaluation for children who are multilingual or monolingual non-English speakers involves collecting, synthesizing and reporting information about functional communication skills in a descriptive manner. This differs from the evaluation process commonly used when standardized scores are applicable. Additionally, there are specific implications for treatment and strategies that have been shown to be more effective when working with this population and their families. The key elements of these processes, including guidelines for working with interpreters, tools for adapting to cultural differences and resource guides that promote best practice, will be discussed. The presenters will provide ways to implement this information in daily speech-language pathology practice.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify three alternative methods for gathering information to support a diagnosis, identify three assessment tools to use when assessing and diagnosing culturally and linguistically diverse children and identify five key components of multilingual evaluation documentation.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 25 - Social Language Skills Training Within School-Based Curriculum: A Collaborative Approach

Rosslyn Delmonico, MA, CCC-SLP, Bubba & Munch Speech Language Services

An increasing number of children today would benefit from social language instruction. Developing positive peer communication can impact social competency and academic success. The role of the speech-language pathologist (SLP), within the school setting is expanding. Through the multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS), we are being given the opportunity to have influence in many areas (i.e. social-emotional wellness) throughout the school system in a way that has not previously been realized. This session will explore the impact that social language training can have on all children across grade levels and curriculum. Attendees will develop a personal road map (PRM) to help them envision how their skill set and professional input could be used as agents for change within their school environments. A social language-based research project will be summarized. This study, Social Conversation and Social Skills: Finding Color in Student Interactions documents the explorations, observations, recordings and reflections of a classroom teacher’s experiences through the implementation of social language-based instruction within her kindergarten classroom setting. Through large and small group interactions, attendees will consider the correlation between social-emotional wellness and academic competency, along with strategic planning for advocacy and collaboration at all levels of the implementation process (i.e. district/school administration, teacher, parents/caregivers and community). The objective is to have participants leave this session inspired by ideas and practical strategies to infuse confidence and intentionality into their efforts to impact children’s social-emotional competency within school environments through their consultative and collaborative efforts.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify and list ways that social language instruction can impact a child’s social-emotional wellness and how it can integrate and enhance academic learning outcomes, list ways in which speech-language pathologists can meet the social language needs of students throughout schools and across curriculum, identify and list practical strategies and hands on tools (i.e. parent letters, community initiatives) to use in the implementation of a personalized road map for increasing social language awareness within schools, home and community.

Level of Learning: Introductory

10:15 am - 12:15 pm

Session 26 - A Rose by any Name: Understanding the Process of Processing

Jeanane Ferre, PhD, CCC-A, Private Practice

Our ability to use what we hear requires the complex interaction of an array of acoustic, phonologic, linguistic and cognitive processes, subserved by the peripheral and central nervous systems. A deficiency in any of these processes results in some type of processing disorder. It is important that speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and audiologists (Auds) not only understand the nature and interaction of the skills involved and the impact of a deficiency in one or more skill sets, but also work together to assess these skills and provide deficit-specific intervention that is effective and appropriate for all listeners, especially school-age children. By understanding the underlying mechanisms, assessment procedures can be developed and used reliably to evaluate the integrity of processing skills among even very young listeners. This differential diagnostic data is used to develop functional and effective intervention plans that minimize a deficit’s adverse effect on the listener’s life, reduce or resolve the deficit itself and promote skill development. This session describes the array of and underlying bases for skills needed to process verbal information, impact of deficits in specific skill sets, and age appropriate assessment tools available to SLPs and Auds. Management strategies and treatment goals and resources for use with school-age children are included.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe component skills needed for processing spoken language and impact of deficiencies in skills on a listener’s life, describe age appropriate assessment techniques to probe the integrity of various listening skills, implement effective intervention (management and remediation) to minimize impact and reduce/resolve deficits.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Session 27 - Cognitive Rehabilitation: Therapy...Therapy...Therapy!, Part 2

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

The United States is facing a situation without precedent: more than 16 million people in the United States today are living with cognitive impairments and the World Health Organization estimates more than 30 million by the year 2050, with less and less people to care for them. Successful cognitive rehabilitation to improve, maintain or reversing cognitive deficits is crucial for everyone's quality of life, patient, family and caregiver! In this innovative session, you will receive 101 evidence-based techniques, strategies and interventions for all levels of cognitive impairment. Whether a patient presents with a mild or severe cognitive impairment, this session teaches which approach to take and which path of interventions to pursue. You will be presented with techniques that will change the brain's neuroplasticity, as well offer compensatory strategies or enhance a patient’s procedure memory. This session offers evidence-based and time-tested treatment techniques and options. It will emphasize the importance and effectiveness of creating highly individualized treatment strategies and provides attendees with the needed skills to choose and adapt techniques into tailored, personalized therapy plans. Active case studies are examined and participants are encouraged in the session to design a patient profile with therapy interventions and goal documentation.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to use evidence-based techniques, strategies and interventions for all levels of cognitive deficits, determine cutting-edge therapy interventions utilizing state-of-the-art memory techniques designed to change the brain's neuroplasticity and apply meaning to everyday therapeutic tasks, increasing patient participation, engagement and functional outcomes.

Level of Learning: Advanced

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Session 28 - Sensational Resumes and Successful Interviews

Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

This interactive session will assist the graduate student in developing an attractive and contemporary resume to facilitate professional employment. Please bring a draft of your qualifications to the session to use in the activities. Small groups will help with identifying key terms and strategies to position past experiences as preparation for your professional duties. Strategies for participating in successful interviews will be discussed. The discussion will cover questions that should be answered and how to prepare for them and questions that should not be asked and how they can be handled professionally. This session is designed for students and for professionals who might be considering a change in job setting but would need to revise their current resume to position themselves for the change and prepare for interviews in a highly competitive employment environment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to recall the essential elements to include in a professional resume, develop an individualized resume based on unique life experiences and apply strategies for maximizing success in a personal employment interview.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 29 - Social Language Strategies for Preschoolers With Visual Impairment

Christine Krekow, MS, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University; Jennifer Cox, TVI, Delta Gamma Center for Children With Visual Impairment

Children who are blind or visually impaired (VI) have unique learning needs. This session will discuss best practice for developing peer relationships and social language skills for preschool children with VI. A pre-transition group experience (Camp Buddy Builder) will be reviewed. Topics include intervention strategies, preparing parents for transition and preliminary research results.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify social language deficits unique to children who are blind or VI, identify strategies for supporting social language skills for children who are blind or VI and facilitate interprofessional implementation of appropriate social language support for children with VI.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Sesion 30 - Surviving Supervision: The Who, What, Why, How of Supervision Training

Barb Meyer, MA, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University; Melissa Passe, MA, CCC-SLP, Truman University

Did you know that beginning January 1, 2020 every speech-language pathologist (SLP) who mentors a clinical fellow or serves as a supervisor for a student clinician or intern will have to have mandatory training in supervision? We are taught how to do therapy, but not how to supervise. This presentation will provide you with some basic need to know information about supervision and some easy and FREE ways to obtain the necessary supervision continuing education. We hope that it will also help you to become a better supervisor! Additionally, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association is considering a specialty certificate in supervision which will be discussed as well!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the importance of supervision training, identify opportunities for continuing education in supervision and identify skills that will strengthen the supervisory process.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 31 - Thinking About a PhD

Stacy Wagovich, PhD, CCC-SLP; Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP, from the University of Missouri

This session will provide an overview of the process involved in obtaining a doctorate in our discipline. Topics will include how to select a focus of study and a mentor, the typical timeline for completion of the degree, opportunities for funding and a general sense of what being a doctoral student is like. If you’re thinking you may be interested in a career in academia, now or in the future, this is the session for you!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to outline the typical sequence of steps in completing a research doctorate, consider the pros (and cons) of doctoral study and a research career, describe experiences and funding opportunities available for doctoral students in our field.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 32 - Trauma - How Language is Impacted

Cheryl Mann, LPC, LCSW, CPC, The Children's Place; Kathy Johnston, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas Medical Center

When a child is suffering from ongoing trauma, he/she can present in many different ways. This session will help the participant understand the different forms of trauma and what happens to the brain when the child experiences trauma. Through video and slide presentations, the participants will be able to understand the impact of trauma on the developing child and different strategies that can be used to help the child remediate. A licensed clinical social worker and a speech-language pathologist team up to present the latest information to participants sharing more than 25 years of experience through a combination of both research and specific case studies.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to name at least three different types of trauma, list at least three different treatment options for immediate use within their practice and describe at least one major part of executive function.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

12:30 pm - 2:15 pm

Session 33 - President's Celebration - Rough Waters and Stormy Seas: A True Test of Leadership

Shelly Chabon, PhD, CCC-SLP, Portland State University

Our workplaces, whether in the public or private sector, are increasingly complicated by limited resources and heightened demands. This often results in conflict and unrest. As stress and anxiety grow, the role of a leader becomes of greater importance. We will consider why some leaders sink and others swim in times of strife and uncertainty and how effective leaders manage to thrive as turmoil around them ebbs and flows.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the characteristics of effective leadership, explore how to navigate leadership challenges and develop effective management strategies for resolving conflict.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Session 34 - Dementia Intervention: Maximizing Functional Outcomes, Part 1

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

Sooner or later, it will touch us all: our patients, family members or someone else close to us is diagnosed with dementia. With our population aging, we are more and more being swept into a flurry of daunting tasks to teach demented patient skills that are hard to come by. More importantly, we are ethically responsible for training the caregiver; training those who have the ultimate responsible for the patient. Knowing how the diseases of dementia unfold is an invaluable tool for success. Knowing HOW to do WHAT and WHEN to do it, depends on knowing what the patient needs and when they need it. We have a professional responsibility to assist the patient in achieving and maintaining their highest level of functioning, and this begins with the ability to accurately stage a patient’s dementia. Once a patient is staged, the needs of the patient can be easily seen. This innovative session presents a staging tool that clearly outlines, at each distinct stage, the patient’s abilities that remain and the patient’s lost abilities; this insight drives intervention. Attendees will discuss the top-evidence-based strategies and communication techniques in the field of dementia. You will leave this dynamic and collaborative session with the confidence and skills to develop a structured, systematic and highly individualized therapy program.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to accurately stage the patient with dementia or other cognitive impairments, utilize patient staging levels to design appropriate treatment interventions, demonstrate successful intervention of errorless learning techniques, spaced retrieval; montessori-based dementia programming; reminiscence therapy and the ability-based approach, implement validation therapy, reflective listening and re-direction to increase communication between you, the patient and the caregiver.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 35 - School-Age Language Assessment Best Practices: Integrating IDEA, State Guidelines, Evidence, Part 1

C. Melanie Schuele, PhD, CCC-SLP, Vanderbilt University

School speech-language pathologists must complete assessment with children for multiple reasons; determine eligibility, capture present levels of performance, measure progress on annual goals for progress reports, annual individualized education program (IEP) review, capture intervention session performance and validate dismissal from special education. Their assessments must help IEP teams understand how weak linguistics skills underlie individual children’s academic struggles. speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have many, many instruments and methods they can access to assess children. The challenge is for SLPs to align instruments and purposes. What questions drive my assessment activities? Which instrument(s) best addresses my question? The purpose of this session is to provide an update for clinicians on school-age language assessment. We will consider kindergarten through high school, with a focus on elementary school. We will begin by revisiting Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to consider how the federal law defines assessment and drives our assessment activities. Then we will think about the clinical questions that underlie each reason for assessment and how these questions inform the choice of assessment instruments or procedures. The goal of the presentation will be to consider how best to align instruments and clinical questions avoiding a one-size-fits-all perspective on commonly administered assessment instruments. We’ll also examine several state guidelines for speech-language assessment and consider whether these guidelines reflect principles of evidence-based assessment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the purposes of varying types of assessment activities that SLP conduct, describe how clinical marker assessments differ from norm-referenced assessments and choose instruments that align best with individual clinical questions.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Session 36 - Language and Literacy: From the Parents Perspective (SLPs too)

Nancy Montgomery, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Pam Craft, MS, CCC-SLP, Butler School District

How does it feel to raise a child who struggles with language and literacy when the mother is a speech-language pathologist? This session will give you two different perspectives and will take you along on two families' journeys through early intervention in the home, early childhood special education, the individualized education program (IEP) process, outside resources and services in middle school. One family lives in a rural setting and one lives in an urban area so you will hear the differences in their stories. The joys and challenges of each step will be included. The role of various professionals will be highlighted and what was helpful and what was not helpful. Navigating the special education maze is difficult for every parent. These two parents understand the rules and procedures and therefore, are in a unique position to examine the process from the inside and the outside and provide some reminders about what makes effective intervention and what makes the special education process more family friendly. Learning to read is a complex process and the answers that these families found will be included.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify warning signs of early language and literacy difficulties, list strategies that are helpful for school-aged clients with language and literacy difficulties, identify parent-friendly practices for speech-language pathologists working with school-aged children and identify key components of effective assessment and intervention of children who have difficulty with literacy skills.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 37 - Making Waves With Dysphagia/Dementia Treatment and Collaboration

Michelle Vomund, MEd, Maryville University; Melissa Hynes, MHS, SSM, Rehabilitation Network St. Louis

Patients who have a dual diagnosis of dementia and dysphagia are complex yet common, and there are therapeutic approaches supported by the literature. This session focuses on best practices regarding clinical documentation, counseling, complex decision-making, a collaborative team approach and current healthcare trends. A brief overview will be provided on the stages of dementia with correlating dysphagia signs and symptoms, as supported by the recent literature. In-depth discussions and interactions, specifically with a dysphagia/dementia decision tree (Smith, Kindell, Baldwin, Waterman and Makin, 2009), will enhance learning. The speech-language pathologist (SLP) role in the end-of-life care team and collaboration with the other health professionals will be discussed, including each professional’s scope of practice. Participants will have an opportunity to use technology to participate in group discussions as well as to practice clinical rationale and decision-making regarding alternative nutrition/hydration (ANH) risks and benefits including against medical advice waivers (AMA) (Horner, 2016). Participants will develop a more comprehensive understanding of how to develop assessments and treatments for these complex patients.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to relate and apply current best practice guidelines and the SLP’s role in the dual diagnosis of dementia and dysphagia, develop interprofessional collaboration to ensure quality service and relate clinical information to facilitate functional outcomes for patients with a dual diagnosis of dementia and dysphagia and integrate current research regarding alternative nutrition/hydration in the dual diagnosis of dementia and dysphagia, construct documentation that will support their clinical decision making as well as providing all possible benefits and risks associated with against medical advice (AMA) diet waivers for individuals with the dual diagnosis.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 38 - Use the Clues: Differential Diagnosis and Intervention for Processing Disorders

Jeanane Ferre, PhD, CCC-A, Private Practice

Running speech can be conceptualized as a series of acoustic patterns to which we attach specific meaning. The listener must analyze, synthesize, attach meaning to and manipulate these patterns receptively and then must organize the information, plan and execute a response. A breakdown at any of these processing steps affects the communication and/or learning event. Assessment techniques are available – both formal and informal – that enable professionals to evaluate differentially the integrity of the process of processing; identifying specifically those skill areas that are deficient. This differential diagnosis leads to differential intervention in which deficit specific management strategies and treatment programs are implemented in order to reduce or resolve the specific deficit and minimize the deficit’s impact on the listener’s communication skills, academic success and sense of self. This advanced-level interactive session is appropriate for both audiologists and speech-language pathologists who have working knowledge of and/or clinical experience with auditory-language processing deficits among school-age children. The session begins with a brief overview of neuroscientific bases of processing and the tools available for assessment of processing skills. The session will focus on interpretation of assessment data and determination of client’s diagnostic profile. Functional impact of diagnosed deficits will be discussed in order to develop deficit-specific intervention plans that include management strategies and treatment goals that meet processing-specific needs and are aligned with educational standards for academics and speaking and listening.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to interpret results of processing assessments in order to identify areas of specific need, make referrals to appropriate personnel for additional assessment as needed, develop and implement effective management and treatment to minimize impact and reduce/resolve deficits and describe the roles/responsibilities of professionals in the multidisciplinary assessment and intervention of processing disorders.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 39 - Practical Applications for the Assessment and Treatment of Multilingual Populations, Part 3

Abby Eubank, MS, CCC-SLP; Sarah Sosland, MA, CCC-SLP, from Children's Mercy Kansas City

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify three actions that maximize the quality of sessions with interpreters, identify three strategies that can be used to repair breakdowns in sessions with interpreters and identify two functional intervention strategies that can be used effectively with culturally and linguistically diverse children and families.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Session 40 - Student Technical Sessions Part 2
4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Session 41 - Dementia Intervention: Maximizing Functional Outcomes, Part 2

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

Sooner or later, it will touch us all: our patients, family members or someone else close to us is diagnosed with dementia. With our population aging, we are more and more being swept into a flurry of daunting tasks to teach demented patient skills that are hard to come by. More importantly, we are ethically responsible for training the caregiver; training those who have the ultimate responsible for the patient. Knowing how the diseases of dementia unfold is an invaluable tool for success. Knowing HOW to do WHAT and WHEN to do it, depends on knowing what the patient needs and when they need it. We have a professional responsibility to assist the patient in achieving and maintaining their highest level of functioning, and this begins with the ability to accurately stage a patient’s dementia. Once a patient is staged, the needs of the patient can be easily seen. This innovative session presents a staging tool that clearly outlines, at each distinct stage, the patient’s abilities that remain and the patient’s lost abilities; this insight drives intervention. Attendees will discuss the top-evidence-based strategies and communication techniques in the field of dementia. You will leave this dynamic and collaborative session with the confidence and skills to develop a structured, systematic and highly individualized therapy program.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to accurately stage the patient with dementia or other cognitive impairments, utilize patient staging levels to design appropriate treatment interventions, demonstrate successful intervention of errorless learning techniques, spaced retrieval; montessori-based dementia programming; reminiscence therapy and the ability-based approach, implement validation therapy, reflective listening and re-direction to increase communication between you, the patient and the caregiver.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 42 - School-Age Language Assessment Best Practices: Integrating IDEA, State Guidelines, Evidence, Part 2

C. Melanie Schuele, Phd, CCC-SLP, Vanderbilt University

School speech-language pathologists must complete assessment with children for multiple reasons; determine eligibility, capture present levels of performance, measure progress on annual goals for progress reports, annual individualized education program (IEP) review, capture intervention session performance and validate dismissal from special education. Their assessments must help IEP teams understand how weak linguistics skills underlie individual children’s academic struggles. speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have many, many instruments and methods they can access to assess children. The challenge is for SLPs to align instruments and purposes. What questions drive my assessment activities? Which instrument(s) best addresses my question? The purpose of this session is to provide an update for clinicians on school-age language assessment. We will consider kindergarten through high school, with a focus on elementary school. We will begin by revisiting Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to consider how the federal law defines assessment and drives our assessment activities. Then we will think about the clinical questions that underlie each reason for assessment and how these questions inform the choice of assessment instruments or procedures. The goal of the presentation will be to consider how best to align instruments and clinical questions avoiding a one-size-fits-all perspective on commonly administered assessment instruments. We’ll also examine several state guidelines for speech-language assessment and consider whether these guidelines reflect principles of evidence-based assessment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the purposes of varying types of assessment activities that SLP conduct, describe how clinical marker assessments differ from norm-referenced assessments and choose instruments that align best with individual clinical questions.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

Session 43 - Children’s Mercy Hospital Cochlear Implantation Program

Katie Kinicaid, AuD, CCC-A, FAAA, Children’s Mercy Hospital

This session will act as an overview to the Cochlear Implant Program at Children’s Mercy Hospital. Among the discussion will include the components to a cochlear implant candidacy evaluation and special considerations for single-sided deafness and medically complex patients. Current candidacy indications for children and special circumstances when patients have become candidates outside traditional guidelines will be discussed. To conclude, there will be several case study examples to incorporate topics covered.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify indications for cochlear implants for children 12-24 months of age, 24 months-17 years, and when exceptions have been requested for earlier implantation, describe special techniques for evaluating and programming complex cochlear implant patients/candidates and recall special considerations for medically complex cochlear implant patients from case study examples.

Session 44 - Finding Balance: Training Gender Congruent Voice and Communication

Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP; Katherine Layne, BS, from the University of Missouri

Speech-language professionals (SLPs) working with individuals identifying on the transgender continuum to modify gender perception of voice and communication must take a multifaceted and individualized intervention approach that is culturally sensitive and in concert with a client's gender identity and preferences. This session will explain modification and habituation of natural-sounding, gender-congruent pitch and pitch range and present techniques to foster appropriate gender-influenced resonance, articulation, intonation, language and non-verbal aspects of communication.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to discuss the importance of good vocal hygiene when training pitch, differentiate between masculine, gender-neutral and feminine vocal and communication behaviors, identify at least three target areas other than pitch that should be addressed to promote gender-congruent speech-language and communication and discuss the importance of using functional, personalized stimuli across all tasks.

Session 45 - NSSLHA Share Session

Greta Roettgen, BS, Truman State Universit; Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A, Truman State University; Dana Fritz, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri; Kim Stewart, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Julie Meyer, B University of Missouri; Lauren Thomas O'Hare, BS, University of Missouri

National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NSSLHA) - How to have a successful NSSLHA Chapter? This session will provide NSSLHA information, executive board discussions, philanthropic ideas, information successful meetings/events, community service ideas, etc. Attendees should be NSSLHA Advisors and students interested in being a NSSLHA member.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to gain greater knowledge regarding participating in the NSSLHA executive boards, share successes and failures with philanthropic events and community service and improve knowledge concerning the national NSSLHA.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 46 - The Aging Swallow

Michelle Payne, MA, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University-SLUCare

With age, there are changes to swallowing function which result from change in the structure, motility, coordination and sensitivity of the swallow process. These changes, in conjunction with other age-related conditions, may make older adults more vulnerable to developing dysphagia. Clinicians are increasingly tasked with evaluating the older adult and must be aware of normal features of swallowing in this population in order to determine whether the patient presents with dysphagia. This session will explore healthy age-related changes to swallow function to prepare the speech-language pathologist to evaluate and diagnose this population.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the difference between a healthy older swallow versus a disordered swallow, identify three changes to swallow function with age and identify appropriate therapeutic approaches to treat elderly with dysphagia.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Sunday

7:15 am - 8:15 am

Session 47 - Poster Presentations - Part III

8:15 am - 10:15 am

Session 48 - Aphasia Communication Theater: Changing the Tide for Aphasia Therapy

Melanie Schwartz, PhD, CCC-SLP, Maryville University

Maryville University Speech and Language Clinic created an innovative program called Aphasia Communication Theater (ACT) in which the clients starred in Wizard of Oz. Participation was offered first to those with aphasia, and was then extended to anyone else in the clinic. We had nine actors who had had strokes, one who had had a brain tumor, one with cerebral palsy and a few supporting actors who filled roles our clients chose not to fill. They had some combination of aphasia, apraxia, dysarthria, difficulty with executive functioning and memory loss. We received special permission from the theater licensing agency to modify the actors’ lines to meet their communication needs. The graduate student clinicians worked with the clients during their biweekly sessions and group rehearsals. The graduate clinicians adjusted lines, provided support on stage during the performances as needed, and found ways to accommodate their clients’ needs outside the therapy setting. The actors reported that the show gave them a sense of purpose, challenged them to gain new skills and was very rewarding. One actor said that instead of being ignored by cashiers and waitresses, he was on stage in a costume and makeup with stage lights in front of an audience that was applauding. ACT provided an incredible opportunity to the clients, graduate student clinicians and the community. This session will include information about the process for creating the show, roles of the students, impact on clients and response from the community. Actors may co-present.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe how an innovative theater program can transform the clinical experience for clients and clinicians, compare therapy in the clinic setting to a community-based experience, imagine how a similar program could be created for your clinic or university program and provide graduate student clinicians with a better understanding of functional therapy through authentic experiences.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 49 - The Independence Continuum: Increasing Communicative Competence in Young Children

Kimberly Gerth, MA, CCC-SLP; Kathryn Muskopf, MS, CCC-SLP, from Rockwood School District

The role of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in preventing prompt dependence will be discussed, along with the crucial task of teaching colleagues on the early childhood team how to foster independence in children's communication skills. The general principles of the independence continuum, a program which is currently in draft and is undergoing limited pilot testing, will be presented. The independence continuum has been designed to increase communicative competence in young children who are at high risk for developing prompt dependence. Children on the autism spectrum, and/or those children who learn best through applied behavior analysis, are excellent candidates for participation. When provided with modeling and nonverbal prompting that is quickly faded, students are taught to initiate and respond appropriately during interactions with an adult communication partner. As skills become independent in an individualized setting, they are then generalized into peer interactions. The achievement of basic self-advocacy, which includes skills such as gaining attention appropriately, answering yes/no questions and expressing wants and needs, is a priority.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the risk factors that may lead to prompt dependence in young children, as well as strategies for preventing or reducing prompt dependence, describe the concept of basic self-advocacy and how it fosters communicative competence in young children, list the ways that the general principles of the independence continuum provide a framework for the child to initiate and respond appropriately during interactions with peers and adults in his/her environment and describe the role of the SLP in collaborating with other members of the early childhood team to create an environment which fosters independent communication skills.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 50 - Voice Boot Camp

Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

Welcome to Voice Boot Camp! The purpose of this session is to provide attendees with background information on competencies needed to provide skilled assessment and treatment to persons with voice disorders. In a 2015 study, Teten, DeVeney and Friehe found that school-based clinicians in the state of Nebraska reported feeling more than moderately competent (a score of three on a one-five scale) on one out of 25 competencies related to assessing and treating persons with voice disorders. We will briefly discuss the survey data from that study. Great emphasis will be placed on reviewing and demonstrating evidence-based techniques regarding assessment and therapy techniques for voice clientele. Case study presentations will allow attendees to problem solve how they would use the techniques demonstrated. The hope is that clinicians will develop some new skills to use in their work settings on Monday morning!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list at least five competencies related to the prevention, assessment and/or treatment of persons with voice disorders, identify both high and low-tech methods for assessing voice, demonstrate the use of and describe the rationale for at least five voice therapy techniques and demonstrate awareness of the evidence-base behind at least two voice therapy techniques.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Session 51 - Phonological Awareness, Decoding, Dyslexia: SLPs Who Promote Literacy Success, Part 1

C. Melanie Schuele, PhD, CCC-SLP, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

The evidence base provides speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and other educators with a clear path to optimize children’s word decoding and spelling outcomes. Critically, struggling learners, including children with speech-language impairment (S-LI), need a strong base of phonological awareness upon which to build decoding and spelling. The research is clear that SLPs are the educational team member best-suited to lead their colleagues in building children’s phonological awareness. Teaching children to read and write is a team sport, particular when considering the needs of struggling learners and continued evolution of multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS). Each student must draw on his/her linguistic foundation of primary language skills (e.g., syntax, semantics) and metalinguistic skills (e.g., phonological awareness) to obtain the reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency needed for school success. SLPs should be critical members of the literacy team; however, many SLPs struggle to define their literacy team role, even for children who receive speech-language services. The purpose of this session is to walk participants down a path that leads them to become SLPs who promote literacy success. Along this path we’ll discuss the literacy learning needs of children with S-LI, the characteristics of teams who meet the needs of struggling learners, the research that supports the unique (and overlapping) SLPs’ contributions on literacy teams, the SLPs’ assessment contributions in pinpointing and describing the struggling learners’ literacy needs and how teams collaboratively meet the varied needs of individual children. Participants will leave with a well-defined plan to become stronger members of literacy teams.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe their unique and overlapping expertise as compared to other literacy team members, define the use of multiple measures of phonological awareness useful for identification and program planning and explain how they will advance the literacy skills of students in their schools, particularly the children for whom they provide speech-language services.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 52 - The Functional Practice of Dysphagia, Part 1

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

Swallowing is a delicate process that can be easily disturbed. It is not a disease in itself but a condition brought on by many causes. The primary goal of treatment for swallowing disorders is to improve the amount and variety of food and liquid swallowed orally while minimizing the risk of aspiration and related complications. This informative and practical session, presents a comprehensive view of assessments and treatments of the intricate swallowing process. Multiple dysphagia assessments, as well as clinical, structural and function esophageal assessments are identified and discussed. Swallow treatment strategies, indirect techniques for management and direct techniques for changing the pattern of the swallow, are outlined specifically reflecting purpose. Step-by-step instructions of compensatory strategies, postural adjustments, maneuvers and exercises are presented with rational for functional use. Goal samples for specific swallow disorders are offered that meet medicare regulations. The foundation of treatment is based on understanding the nature of the swallowing process; the main theme of this session is to correctly identify the precise swallowing disorder(s) followed by identifying the effective treatment strategies!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the foundation for dysphagia treatment by understanding the nature of the swallow disorder(s), distinguish between structural and functional esophageal dysphagia disorders and discuss treatment interventions, specify step-by-step directions for all compensatory strategies, postural adjustments maneuvers and exercises with explanation of purpose and rational for function and identify risk factors for aspiration pneumonia and the substantial role of oral hygiene.

Level of Learning: Advanced

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Session 53 - We Read to Know We’re not Alone: Aphasia Book Clubs

Barbara Meyer, MA, CCC-SLP, from Fontbonne University; Jessica Lynn Cochran, BS; Amanda Eaton, PhD, CCC-SLP

One of the major concerns heard from aphasia clients is that they desire to read and to have the confidence to discuss what they have read with others. This session will provide an overview of using a “book club” model as a vehicle for group therapy for aphasia clients. Throughout the session, we will discuss the benefits of this model in areas of language and cognition. Favorable settings for aphasia book clubs will be described. Information on resources that facilitate aphasia book clubs will be provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to discuss the benefits of using book clubs as a vehicle for group therapy, describe favorable settings for book clubs as group therapy and identify resources that facilitate group therapy.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:30 am - 12:00 am

Session 54 - Phonological Awareness, Decoding, Dyslexia: SLPs Who Promote Literacy Success, Part 2

C. Melanie Schuele, CCC-SLP, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

The evidence base provides speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and other educators with a clear path to optimize children’s word decoding and spelling outcomes. Critically, struggling learners, including children with speech-language impairment (S-LI), need a strong base of phonological awareness upon which to build decoding and spelling. The research is clear that SLPs are the educational team member best-suited to lead their colleagues in building children’s phonological awareness. Teaching children to read and write is a team sport, particular when considering the needs of struggling learners and continued evolution of multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS). Each student must draw on his/her linguistic foundation of primary language skills (e.g., syntax, semantics) and metalinguistic skills (e.g., phonological awareness) to obtain the reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency needed for school success. SLPs should be critical members of the literacy team; however, many SLPs struggle to define their literacy team role, even for children who receive speech-language services. The purpose of this session is to walk participants down a path that leads them to become SLPs who promote literacy success. Along this path we’ll discuss the literacy learning needs of children with S-LI, the characteristics of teams who meet the needs of struggling learners, the research that supports the unique (and overlapping) SLPs’ contributions on literacy teams, the SLPs’ assessment contributions in pinpointing and describing the struggling learners’ literacy needs and how teams collaboratively meet the varied needs of individual children. Participants will leave with a well-defined plan to become stronger members of literacy teams.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe their unique and overlapping expertise as compared to other literacy team members, define the use of multiple measures of phonological awareness useful for identification and program planning and explain how they will advance the literacy skills of students in their schools, particularly the children for whom they provide speech-language services.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 55 - The Functional Practice of Dysphagia, Part 2

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

Swallowing is a delicate process that can be easily disturbed. It is not a disease in itself but a condition brought on by many causes. The primary goal of treatment for swallowing disorders is to improve the amount and variety of food and liquid swallowed orally while minimizing the risk of aspiration and related complications. This informative and practical session, presents a comprehensive view of assessments and treatments of the intricate swallowing process. Multiple dysphagia assessments, as well as clinical, structural and function esophageal assessments are identified and discussed. Swallow treatment strategies, indirect techniques for management and direct techniques for changing the pattern of the swallow, are outlined specifically reflecting purpose. Step-by-step instructions of compensatory strategies, postural adjustments, maneuvers and exercises are presented with rational for functional use. Goal samples for specific swallow disorders are offered that meet medicare regulations. The foundation of treatment is based on understanding the nature of the swallowing process; the main theme of this session is to correctly identify the precise swallowing disorder(s) followed by identifying the effective treatment strategies!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the foundation for dysphagia treatment by understanding the nature of the swallow disorder(s), distinguish between structural and functional esophageal dysphagia disorders and discuss treatment interventions, specify step-by-step directions for all compensatory strategies, postural adjustments maneuvers and exercises with explanation of purpose and rational for function and identify risk factors for aspiration pneumonia and the substantial role of oral hygiene.

Level of Learning: Advanced

10:30 am - 12:30 pm

Session 56 - Finishing Strong: Clinical Fellowship Decision-Making

Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

This session is designed for graduate students and focuses on the importance of making good professional decisions when choosing a clinical fellowship (CF) practice setting. A brief overview of potential practice settings, the importance of the CF mentor relationship, how to find a job and common pitfalls to avoid will be explored. Understanding that the CF represents the final piece of a new clinician's education will be emphasized.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe three potential CF practice settings, identify three ways to find a CF position, explain two elements of a successful CF-mentor relationship and identify two positive and two negative signs when weighing a job offer.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 57 - SMART Goals for Social Communication: Writing, Tracking and Enlisting Collaboration

Shannon Locke, MS, CCC-SLP, MSU/MO-DESE - Project ACCESS

This session will be a discussion of real world outcomes for the individuals we serve in schools and outpatient therapy identified as having autism. Thinking in terms of lifetime outcomes for independence, income and happy adult lives, we will explore best practice in writing goals to address social-communication and other necessary soft skills for employability. Methods to write goals that merge Missouri learning standards with non-academic targeted skills will be reviewed. There will also be a review of how to prioritize goals, clearly define target skills and the supports necessary for successful outcomes and determine noninvasive data collection methods to guide intervention. We will also look at creating rubrics and other methods to help enlist individual self-evaluation and encourage data collection by other educators or providers across multiple settings.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to advocate for goals to support social-communication and soft skills beyond academics based on national statistics and movements in intervention for individuals with autism, write clearly defined SMART goals for social-communication and other soft skills that align with Missouri learning standards and determine data collection methods appropriate for the goals written that can also be easily collected by the students themselves and/or other educators or providers working with our students.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:45 am - 12:45 pm

Session 58 - Ob-la-di, Ob-la-da, Life Goes On: Starting an Aphasia Choir

Aphasia choirs enable individuals with aphasia exhibiting communication deficits to participate in a community-based activity with others of similar abilities in an inviting and fun environment. Aphasia choirs benefit those with aphasia by incorporating melodic intonation therapy with a social activity that allows the development of a new skill while building self-confidence. The focus of this session includes the benefits of an aphasia choir and how to initiate an aphasia choir within a community. The first half of the session will explain the various ways aphasia choir benefits its participants in the areas of therapy, learning new a new skill and building self-confidence in community-based setting. The last portion of the session will explain the steps to starting a choir including recruiting participants and volunteers, procuring a rehearsal space, scheduling of practices and selecting appropriate repertoire for participants. A sample of a performance by a current aphasia choir will be provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the benefits of music in aphasia therapy, contrast the risks/benefits of social isolation/social engagement in aphasia recovery and explain the steps to starting an aphasia choir including recruiting appropriate participants and volunteers, scheduling logistics and selecting appropriate repertoire and supports for participants.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

 
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