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2018 Covention

MSHA Convention Program

Thursday Sessions
Friday Sessions
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Thursday

7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Session 1 - Round Robin

This informal session will allow presenters and attendees to converse and interact on topics related to research or clinical practice in speech-language pathology or audiology. Presenters will speak for 10-15 minutes on a research or clinical topic within their scope of expertise and allow 5-10 minutes of discussion and questions among the attendees.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to restate two main points from the presenter’s ideas or research, cite two resources for further research on the topics presented and articulate one way they could apply this new research or clinical practice in their work setting.

Level of Learning: Introductory

8:15 pm - 9:15 pm

Session 2 - Ask MSHA

This session will utilize a panel discussion format comprised of MSHA Executive Board members and ASHA Advisory Council to focus on issues and trends impacting the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology including reimbursement, legislation at state and federal levels, graduate level training programs, state licensure requirements and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s (DESE) implementer model. Panel members will detail how these issues directly impact the practices of speech-language pathologists and audiologists and will provide information as to how actions at the local, state and national levels can influence change. Participants will be given an opportunity to ask questions and to contribute to the discussion.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the history of Missouri licensure and certification requirements related to the schools, identify at least three issues impacting service delivery and list pending legislation impacting our professions at both a state and national level.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Friday

8:00 am - 11:30 am

Session 3 - Short Course - Improving Language and Literacy Outcomes for Individuals Who use AACt

This short course will be repeated as Session 11.

Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

Children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies often struggle to develop functional literacy skills. In recent years, researchers have focused on methodological approaches to literacy assessment and intervention for this population with promising results. In general, improvements in language and literacy skills have been noted when intervention focused on multiple linguistic strategies in environments that emphasized active engagement in authentic tasks. As language experts, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) play an important role as part of collaborative teams that help children who use AAC acquire emergent and conventional literacy skills. Knowledge of the relationships between all language domains and how these support conventional literacy skill development is essential to achieving positive outcomes. Ensuring that AAC systems support the continuum of literacy skill acquisition is challenging, but critical. The purpose of this short course is to familiarize participants with a wide range of evidence-based literacy assessment and intervention methods useful for working with children who require AAC. Specific strategies will be presented along with the opportunity to practice in a hands-on AAC lab environment with a variety of AAC devices. Participation is limited to 30 individuals to allow adequate time to practice during the hands-on portion of the course.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the literacy challenges that individuals who use AAC experience, summarize recent research evidence related to effective literacy instruction for individuals who use AAC, describe specific strategies to promote literacy development for children who use AAC and create literacy interventions using AAC technologies.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:00 am - 4:30 pm

Day Institute - Modern Medical Speech Language Pathology: It’s all About the Disease

James Coyle, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, University of Pittsburgh

The aerodigestive tract is the upper part of the respiratory and digestive systems, serving physiologic functions first (including swallowing) and communications functions second. It is not the speech mechanism, swallowing mechanism or vocal tract. So understanding the normal and pathological physiologic function of both halves of the aerodigestive system is crucial to the selection of intuitive and appropriate diagnostic procedures and management plans in patients with communication and swallowing disorders caused by pulmonary and digestive diseases, artificial airways, iatrogenic disorders following cardiothoracic and other procedures and neurological conditions. This day institute will explore the structure and function of the respiratory and digestive systems, the effects of pulmonary diseases on breathing and swallowing and how digestive diseases, particularly esophageal conditions, produce dysphagia symptoms, as well as how they are evaluated and what the test results mean. We will review the differential diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia, the effects of health on human physiology, how to identify risk factors for dysphagia-related adverse outcomes (with a focus on pneumonia) in adults in acute and intensive care units and discuss various common forms of dysphagia treatment, updating long standing knowledge of their effects with more recent evidence.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the ventilatory and respiratory roles of the respiratory system, describe respiratory and deglutitive interactions in the aerodigestive tract, differentiate between aspiration- and other etiologies of pneumonia and other common respiratory conditions through medical record evidence and explain what the diagnoses of common esophageal pathologies mean and how they might lead to dysphagia symptoms.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Session 4 - AAC: Fostering Emergent Literacy

Amanda Hettenhausen, MAR, CCC-SLP, Saltillo Corporation

Research indicates 90% of people using alternative or augmentative communication (AAC) enter adulthood without acquiring functional literacy skills, yet research also tells us everyone can read and write. How do we bridge this gap? This session will help participants understand the foundation and development of literacy. Participants will learn research-based strategies to foster emergent literacy skills for individuals who use AAC, specifically, related to providing shared reading, making reading materials accessible, engaging in early writing activities and supporting early phonological awareness skills. A variety of materials and a demonstration of tools within the Chat Software will be shared, giving participants ideas to get started fostering emergent literacy.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the relationship between reading, writing, listening and communicating, identify components of emergent literacy, apply techniques for developing emergent literacy skills for individuals who use AAC and list available tools to support literacy development for individuals who use AAC.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 5 - Genetics and Hearing Loss

Gerald Schaefer, MD, University of Arkansas

Hearing loss has multiple etiologies. Not surprisingly, genetic factors are some of the more common known causes. In addition gene-environment interactions influence the expression of the hearing loss. This session will focus on identifying the specific etiology of hearing loss in persons with hearing impairments. We will discuss the genetic cause, associated medical conditions and familiar implications. We will review the causes of hearing loss in context of pathogenesis (i.e. what mechanism is affected). This will set the frame work for possible therapies in the future. Finally we will discuss the role of the geneticist in an HI team. We will talk about the interactions of audiologists and speech-language pathologists as we share common patients. We will outline how to evaluate these families so that they are prepared in anticipation of the referral for genetic evaluations.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to recognize common genetic mechanisms that can affect hearing, analyze the tiered process in the genetic evaluation of hearing loss and identify the primary reasons for a referral for genetic evaluation.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Session 6 - Educational Planning: For Students With Cochlear Implants

MaryAnn Kinsella-Meier, AuD, CCC-A; Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

Professionals and parents of students with cochlear implants are faced with determining the best educational placement for their child. The Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center and the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program at Boston Children's Hospital partnered to develop guidelines to support educational planning. Teachers, speech-language pathologists, audiologists, allied professionals and parents of students who have a clinical instructor are faced with determining the best placement, services and accommodations necessary to assure that the child has appropriate access to school-wide curriculum. Unfortunately, there is a paucity in the available resources that help foster these important discussions and considerations. This free, comprehensive tool, Student's With Cochlear Implants: Guidelines for Educational Planning, provides professionals and parents with essential information on how to best facilitate discussions regarding educational planning needs of each student with a cochlear implant, regardless of educational setting or communication modality.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the type of students who can benefit from this tool, analyze the importance of discussing educational placements, support services and the other variables critical to promoting educational success, discuss the varied educational placements, support services and variables critical to promoting educational success for students using cochlear implant technology and explain the components of the appendices and other resources contained with the guidelines and how they can be beneficial to their work.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Session 7 - Out of the Dark With LAMP: Four AAC Case Studies

Amanda DeBord, MS, CCC-SLP, St Louis Public Schools; Gretchen Bright, BS, Prentke Romich Company

Follow the one-year journey of the language acquisition through motor planning (LAMP) approach of four students in the public school setting. LAMP is a therapeutic approach based on neurological and motor learning principles. The goal is to give individuals who are nonverbal or have limited verbal abilities a method of independently and spontaneously expressing themselves in any setting through the use of augmentative and alternative communication ( AAC). The students who will be featured are of varying age and language skill set. Participants will view videos and data logging demonstrating student progress. Each case study will highlight baseline skills and behaviors, the implementation strategies used, obstacles encountered and acceptance levels of the teams.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify and describe three effective practices while teaching AAC, ascertain three strategies for overcoming obstacles with staff and students and analyze four profiles using the language data logging website.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 8 - Practical Applications for the Assessment and Treatment of Multilingual Populations, Part 1

Abby Eubank, MS, CCC-SLP; Sarah Sosland, MA, CCC-SLP, from Children's Mercy Kansas City

The process of completing a comprehensive speech-language evaluation for children who are multilingual or monolingual non-English speakers involves collecting, synthesizing and reporting information about functional communication skills in a descriptive manner. This differs from the evaluation process commonly used when standardized scores are applicable. Additionally, there are specific implications for treatment and strategies that have been shown to be more effective when working with this population and their families. The key elements of these processes, including guidelines for working with interpreters, tools for adapting to cultural differences and resource guides that promote best practice, will be discussed. The presenters will provide ways to implement this information in daily speech-language pathology practice.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify two similarities between monolingual and multilingual language development, identify two resources to help them modify services provided to culturally and linguistically diverse children and families and identify two limitations of standard scores.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 9 - School Services Update

Pat Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Liberty Public Schools; Beth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District; Diane Cordry Golden, PhD, Missouri Council of Administrators of Special Education; Sharon Sowder, MA, CCC-SLP, Ozarks Medical Center

The purpose of this session is to inform the MSHA membership with respect to proposed and/or new standards and the impact on speech-language pathologists working in the school setting. The new eligibility criteria for language impairment and sound system disorder will be reviewed.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the current language impairment and sound system disorder criterion, describe the changes with the new language impairment and sound system disorder criterion and list changes with eligibility criterion regarding voice and fluency disorder.

Level of Learning: Introductory

1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Session 10 - Student Technical Sessions Part 1
1:00 pm - 4:30 pm

Session 11 - Short Course - Improving Language and Literacy Outcomes for Individuals Who use AAC

Repeated from Session 3.

Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP, Rockhurst University

Children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) strategies often struggle to develop functional literacy skills. In recent years, researchers have focused on methodological approaches to literacy assessment and intervention for this population with promising results. In general, improvements in language and literacy skills have been noted when intervention focused on multiple linguistic strategies in environments that emphasized active engagement in authentic tasks. As language experts, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) play an important role as part of collaborative teams that help children who use AAC acquire emergent and conventional literacy skills. Knowledge of the relationships between all language domains and how these support conventional literacy skill development is essential to achieving positive outcomes. Ensuring that AAC systems support the continuum of literacy skill acquisition is challenging, but critical. The purpose of this short course is to familiarize participants with a wide range of evidence-based literacy assessment and intervention methods useful for working with children who require AAC. Specific strategies will be presented along with the opportunity to practice in a hands-on AAC lab environment with a variety of AAC devices. Participation is limited to 30 individuals to allow adequate time to practice during the hands-on portion of the course.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the literacy challenges that individuals who use AAC experience, summarize recent research evidence related to effective literacy instruction for individuals who use AAC, describe specific strategies to promote literacy development for children who use AAC and create literacy interventions using AAC technologies.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Session 12 - Genetics and Communication Disorders

Gerald Schaefer, MD, University of Arkansas

Audiologists and speech pathologists encounter many patients with some form of communication disorder, either as a primary diagnosis or as an associated secondary condition. Communication and social-communication disorders have a strong genetics component to them. Determining the genetic cause can be extremely helpful for the patients and their families and the professionals that work with them. A genetic answer can identify the cause, determine the prognosis, provide recurrence risks and know about associated (co-morbid) medical conditions. In this session, we will review what is known about the genetics causes of communication disorders. We will discuss what is involved in the genetic evaluation of them and when to refer for evaluation.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to understand the genetic basis of communication disorders, recall the components of a genetic evaluation and recognize the benefits to families of a genetic evaluation.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

3:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session 13 - Empowering the SLP in School-Wide Positive Behavior Support

Heather Hatton, PhD, University of Missouri; Deanna Maynard, NBCT, Missouri Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support; Laura Frye, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri, Columbia

Significant and inappropriate student behavior poses a formidable challenge for any practitioner. Chronic, low level inappropriate behaviors (e.g., blurting out, fidgeting, etc.) also impede effective intervention practices in therapy and prevent successful generalization of new skills into classroom settings (Lewis, Hatton, Jorgenson and Maynard, 2017). Increasingly, schools implement school-wide positive behavior interventions and supports (SWPBIS), or multi-tiered systems of support to improve behavioral and academic outcomes for all students. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) typically receive little formal training in these systems prior to encountering team collaboration in the field. There is a communicative nature of problem behavior that school-based SLPs are positioned to facilitate if they understand the functional relationship between the behavior and the learning environment(s)(Lewis, Mitchell, Harvey, Green and McKenzie, 2015). Effective school-based SLPs should be able to readily identify inappropriate student behavior(s) and assist the student in learning appropriate replacement behavior(s) in the therapy room and collaborate with the classroom teacher to ensure the replacement behaviors generalize to inclusive settings. The purpose of this session is to increase the SLP’S understanding of the utility of SWPBIS, promote SLP knowledge, practice as viable SWPBIS team members and empower SLPs to implement effective, evidence-based practices for managing and changing inappropriate student behaviors.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to discuss function of behavior in terms of antecedent, behavior and consequence, complete a behavior pathway and develop a summary statement, connect effective classroom/therapy room practices to the function of the behavior and identify replacement behaviors and communication skills.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 14 - Living the ICF Model: Patient's Perspective

Greg Turner, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Joni Turner, MS

As speech-language pathologists (SLPs), we consistently come in contact with a variety of patients exhibiting conditions that are chronic in nature. Chronic illness can directly and indirectly influence many of the domains found with the SLP's scope of practice. This can range from the pharmacological treatments to the inability to cope with the disorder. Fortunately, only a small minority of our colleagues actually live the experience of chronic disease. The purpose of this session is to gain understanding from a fellow colleague who has dealt with a chronic infectious disease over the last 10 years. This disease has led to chronic pain and chronic fatigue. It also resulted in a permanent disability. Her lived experiences from a professional perspective will provide participants with a unique understanding of factors important to both the assessment and treatment process.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to recall the application of the international classification of functioning model to chronic pain and chronic fatigue, identify the influence the nature of chronic pain and/or chronic fatigue and the medical treatment have on cognitive and linguistic skills and identify steps they will take in their practice to improve care for the patients they work with who exhibit chronic pain and/or chronic fatigue.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 15 - Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets: How Does it Work?

Amy Clark, MS, CCC-SLP, PROMPT Institute

Prompts for restructuring oral muscular phonetic targets (PROMPT) is a philosophy approach system and technique that helps clients reach their full potential. This session will describe the multidimensional philosophy and application principles. In addition, current and past PROMPT research studies will be reviewed. Interactive case studies will highlight how PROMPT is applied in assessment and treatment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe the philosophy and application principles of PROMPT, list and explain PROMPT research and identify key components of PROMPT assessment and treatment.

Level of Learning: Introductory

4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Session 16 - Mentoring and Supervision of Young Professionals: Strategies and Resources

Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University; Beth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City Schools; Patricia Jones, MS, CCC-SLP, Liberty Public Schools Franklin Elementary

The purpose of the session is to facilitate discussion on mentoring and supervision strategies related to various work settings, including documentation, licensure, ethical issues and other areas that impact the entry-level professionals and supervisors. During this session, the project titled, MSHA Mentoring Young Professionals Program (MMYP) will be discussed. MMYP is intended to nurture our graduate students and entry-level professionals by cultivating the culture of mentoring. The program provides mentoring services to graduate students as well as clinical fellows via web-based meetings, webinars and face-to-face roundtable meetings at the Convention. Finally, specific strategies will be discussed to ensure successful work in school settings. Strategies for mentoring will also be addressed along with resources.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to demonstrate an understanding of practice issues in school settings as well as other employment settings, identify specific strategies to achieve their professional and personal goals and locate and gather information/resources on mentoring.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Session 17 - Poster Presentations -Part 1
Saturday

7:00 am - 8:00 am

Session 18 - Poster Presentations - Part 2
8:30 am - 10:00 am

Session 19 - Cognitive Rehabilitation: Therapy...Therapy...Therapy!, Part 1

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

The United States is facing a situation without precedent: more than 16 million people in the United States today are living with cognitive impairments and the World Health Organization estimates more than 30 million by the year 2050, with less and less people to care for them. Successful cognitive rehabilitation to improve, maintain or reversing cognitive deficits is crucial for everyone's quality of life, patient, family and caregiver! In this innovative session, you will receive 101 evidence-based techniques, strategies and interventions for all levels of cognitive impairment. Whether a patient presents with a mild or severe cognitive impairment, this session teaches which approach to take and which path of interventions to pursue. You will be presented with techniques that will change the brain's neuroplasticity, as well offer compensatory strategies or enhance a patient’s procedure memory. This session offers evidence-based and time-tested treatment techniques and options. It will emphasize the importance and effectiveness of creating highly individualized treatment strategies and provides attendees with the needed skills to choose and adapt techniques into tailored, personalized therapy plans. Active case studies are examined and participants are encouraged in the session to design a patient profile with therapy interventions and goal documentation.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to use evidence-based techniques, strategies and interventions for all levels of cognitive deficits, determine cutting-edge therapy interventions utilizing state-of-the-art memory techniques designed to change the brain's neuroplasticity and apply meaning to everyday therapeutic tasks, increasing patient participation, engagement and functional outcomes.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 20 - Setting Language in Motion: An Early Intervention Resource

MaryAnn Kinsella-Meier, AuD, CCC-A, Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center

This session will focus on evidence-based, practical information addressing topics integral to the identification process and intervention opportunities for infants and their families. A review of the critical components necessary to promote early language acquisition as well as tips on how this information can be used effectively with families and service providers will be highlighted. Based on a collaborative effort between the Laurent Clerc National Deaf Education Center and the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program for Boston Children’s Hospital, a free web-based resource has been developed to meet this need. Setting language in motion is designed for early intervention providers, educators of deaf children, early childhood specialists, speech-language pathologists, audiologists, allied professionals, parents and other caregivers. Seven modules are available in American sign language, English and Spanish. Parent interviews, videos of audiologic testing, downloadable resources as well as activity guide sheets are all components of this free resource.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify information contained within the seven modules that can be shared with families to support early intervention needs, identify at least two concepts they can use in their work with families in early identification and intervention, develop an understanding of the information contained within these modules and apply how the activity sheets and downloadable resources can be incorporated into their work.

Level of Learning: Introductory

8:30 am - 10:30 am

Session 21 - Academically Able and Autism

Shannon Locke, MS, CCC-SLP; Terri Carrington, MA, CCC-SLP, from MSU/MO-DESE - Project ACCESS

You may have students who are identified as having autism, either educationally or medically, but are considered high functioning and have not met eligibility for significant academic services. However, these students still struggle, especially with social communication and executive functioning skills. While these students with autism may be academically able, they demonstrate deficits impacting their overall educational performance, including their ability to socialize and be successful post-secondary in gaining employment and becoming contributing citizens and good neighbors. This session will focus on identifying these students, their needs and suggestions for effective educational programming for them.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to analyze the impact of autism on educational performance and preparing for post-secondary life beyond the academic skills needed to make the grade, recognize non-standardized measures to assess and identify the needs of individuals with autism that are able to perform content area skills academically, yet lack the necessary soft skills for independence and employment and list contributing components that collectively make up an individuals’ soft skills and identify specific strategies to support development of these soft skills in students with autism receiving minimal to no special education minutes.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 22 - Difficult Conversations

Lisa Goran, PhD, CCC-SLP; Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A; Melissa Passe, MA, CCC-SLP; Andrea Richards, MA, CCC-SLP; Janet Gooch, PhD, CCC-SLP; from Truman State University

In today's professional climate, the speech-language pathologist (SLP) and audiologist are often faced with the task of initiating and conducting difficult conversations with a variety of individuals as they relate to myriad factors including classroom/clinic performance, job performance, knowledge and skill acquisition, interpersonal abilities and their future success in their given position. This session will spend some time identifying the context in which these conversations are likely to occur, strategies for successfully communicating about these issues to the best possible satisfaction of all concerned and the importance/necessity of tracking and sharing the results of these conversations with all relevant parties.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify warning signs that a difficult conversation is imminent, identify strategies used to navigate through a difficult conversation across a variety of contexts and analyze the tracking process to ensure communication following the difficult conversation is recorded appropriately for possible future legal issues

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 23 - MSHA's Town Hall Meeting with ASHA Liaison

Janet Deppe, MS, CCC-SLP, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association; Beth McKerlie, MS, CCC-SLP, North Kansas City School District

Service delivery in the fields of audiology and speech-language pathology is constantly evolving. Professionals working in education settings, healthcare settings and in universities are experiencing dramatic changes as government spending and healthcare and education policies are changing at the national and state levels. Join us for a town hall-style conversation with our American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) liaison. Changes in education and healthcare will be discussed, as well as their impact on members of MSHA and the consumers of our services. Attendees will have the opportunity to share their issues and concerns, as well as their expectations from ASHA in this changing landscape.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list several recent changes to the education/healthcare policy that will affect their practice, describe the impact of these changes to their practice and earn strategies for adapting to change in order to improve outcomes for their clients.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 24 - Practical Applications for the Assessment and Treatment of Multilingual Populations, Part 2

Abby Eubank, MS, CCC-SLP; Sarah Sosland, MA, CCC-SLP, from Children's Mercy Kansas City

The process of completing a comprehensive speech-language evaluation for children who are multilingual or monolingual non-English speakers involves collecting, synthesizing and reporting information about functional communication skills in a descriptive manner. This differs from the evaluation process commonly used when standardized scores are applicable. Additionally, there are specific implications for treatment and strategies that have been shown to be more effective when working with this population and their families. The key elements of these processes, including guidelines for working with interpreters, tools for adapting to cultural differences and resource guides that promote best practice, will be discussed. The presenters will provide ways to implement this information in daily speech-language pathology practice.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify three alternative methods for gathering information to support a diagnosis, identify three assessment tools to use when assessing and diagnosing culturally and linguistically diverse children and identify five key components of multilingual evaluation documentation.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 25 - Social Language Skills Training Within School-Based Curriculum: A Collaborative Approach

Rosslyn Delmonico, MA, CCC-SLP, Bubba & Munch Speech Language Services

An increasing number of children today would benefit from social language instruction. Developing positive peer communication can impact social competency and academic success. The role of the speech-language pathologist (SLP), within the school setting is expanding. Through the multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS), we are being given the opportunity to have influence in many areas (i.e. social-emotional wellness) throughout the school system in a way that has not previously been realized. This session will explore the impact that social language training can have on all children across grade levels and curriculum. Attendees will develop a personal road map (PRM) to help them envision how their skill set and professional input could be used as agents for change within their school environments. A social language-based research project will be summarized. This study, Social Conversation and Social Skills: Finding Color in Student Interactions documents the explorations, observations, recordings and reflections of a classroom teacher’s experiences through the implementation of social language-based instruction within her kindergarten classroom setting. Through large and small group interactions, attendees will consider the correlation between social-emotional wellness and academic competency, along with strategic planning for advocacy and collaboration at all levels of the implementation process (i.e. district/school administration, teacher, parents/caregivers and community). The objective is to have participants leave this session inspired by ideas and practical strategies to infuse confidence and intentionality into their efforts to impact children’s social-emotional competency within school environments through their consultative and collaborative efforts.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify and list ways that social language instruction can impact a child’s social-emotional wellness and how it can integrate and enhance academic learning outcomes, list ways in which speech-language pathologists can meet the social language needs of students throughout schools and across curriculum, identify and list practical strategies and hands on tools (i.e. parent letters, community initiatives) to use in the implementation of a personalized road map for increasing social language awareness within schools, home and community.

Level of Learning: Introductory

10:15 am - 12:15 pm

Session 26 - A Rose by any Name: Understanding the Process of Processing

Jeanane Ferre, PhD, CCC-A, Private Practice

Our ability to use what we hear requires the complex interaction of an array of acoustic, phonologic, linguistic and cognitive processes, subserved by the peripheral and central nervous systems. A deficiency in any of these processes results in some type of processing disorder. It is important that speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and audiologists (Auds) not only understand the nature and interaction of the skills involved and the impact of a deficiency in one or more skill sets, but also work together to assess these skills and provide deficit-specific intervention that is effective and appropriate for all listeners, especially school-age children. By understanding the underlying mechanisms, assessment procedures can be developed and used reliably to evaluate the integrity of processing skills among even very young listeners. This differential diagnostic data is used to develop functional and effective intervention plans that minimize a deficit’s adverse effect on the listener’s life, reduce or resolve the deficit itself and promote skill development. This session describes the array of and underlying bases for skills needed to process verbal information, impact of deficits in specific skill sets, and age appropriate assessment tools available to SLPs and Auds. Management strategies and treatment goals and resources for use with school-age children are included.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe component skills needed for processing spoken language and impact of deficiencies in skills on a listener’s life, describe age appropriate assessment techniques to probe the integrity of various listening skills, implement effective intervention (management and remediation) to minimize impact and reduce/resolve deficits.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Session 27 - Cognitive Rehabilitation: Therapy...Therapy...Therapy!, Part 2

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

The United States is facing a situation without precedent: more than 16 million people in the United States today are living with cognitive impairments and the World Health Organization estimates more than 30 million by the year 2050, with less and less people to care for them. Successful cognitive rehabilitation to improve, maintain or reversing cognitive deficits is crucial for everyone's quality of life, patient, family and caregiver! In this innovative session, you will receive 101 evidence-based techniques, strategies and interventions for all levels of cognitive impairment. Whether a patient presents with a mild or severe cognitive impairment, this session teaches which approach to take and which path of interventions to pursue. You will be presented with techniques that will change the brain's neuroplasticity, as well offer compensatory strategies or enhance a patient’s procedure memory. This session offers evidence-based and time-tested treatment techniques and options. It will emphasize the importance and effectiveness of creating highly individualized treatment strategies and provides attendees with the needed skills to choose and adapt techniques into tailored, personalized therapy plans. Active case studies are examined and participants are encouraged in the session to design a patient profile with therapy interventions and goal documentation.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to use evidence-based techniques, strategies and interventions for all levels of cognitive deficits, determine cutting-edge therapy interventions utilizing state-of-the-art memory techniques designed to change the brain's neuroplasticity and apply meaning to everyday therapeutic tasks, increasing patient participation, engagement and functional outcomes.

Level of Learning: Advanced

11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Session 28 - Sensational Resumes and Successful Interviews

Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP, Southeast Missouri State University

This interactive session will assist the graduate student in developing an attractive and contemporary resume to facilitate professional employment. Please bring a draft of your qualifications to the session to use in the activities. Small groups will help with identifying key terms and strategies to position past experiences as preparation for your professional duties. Strategies for participating in successful interviews will be discussed. The discussion will cover questions that should be answered and how to prepare for them and questions that should not be asked and how they can be handled professionally. This session is designed for students and for professionals who might be considering a change in job setting but would need to revise their current resume to position themselves for the change and prepare for interviews in a highly competitive employment environment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to recall the essential elements to include in a professional resume, develop an individualized resume based on unique life experiences and apply strategies for maximizing success in a personal employment interview.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 29 - Social Language Strategies for Preschoolers With Visual Impairment

Christine Krekow, MS, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University; Jennifer Cox, TVI, Delta Gamma Center for Children With Visual Impairment

Children who are blind or visually impaired (VI) have unique learning needs. This session will discuss best practice for developing peer relationships and social language skills for preschool children with VI. A pre-transition group experience (Camp Buddy Builder) will be reviewed. Topics include intervention strategies, preparing parents for transition and preliminary research results.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify social language deficits unique to children who are blind or VI, identify strategies for supporting social language skills for children who are blind or VI and facilitate interprofessional implementation of appropriate social language support for children with VI.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Sesion 30 - Surviving Supervision: The Who, What, Why, How of Supervision Training

Barb Meyer, MA, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University; Melissa Passe, MA, CCC-SLP, Truman University

Did you know that beginning January 1, 2020 every speech-language pathologist (SLP) who mentors a clinical fellow or serves as a supervisor for a student clinician or intern will have to have mandatory training in supervision? We are taught how to do therapy, but not how to supervise. This presentation will provide you with some basic need to know information about supervision and some easy and FREE ways to obtain the necessary supervision continuing education. We hope that it will also help you to become a better supervisor! Additionally, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association is considering a specialty certificate in supervision which will be discussed as well!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the importance of supervision training, identify opportunities for continuing education in supervision and identify skills that will strengthen the supervisory process.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 31 - Thinking About a PhD

Stacy Wagovich, PhD, CCC-SLP; Elizabeth Kelley, PhD, CCC-SLP, from the University of Missouri

This session will provide an overview of the process involved in obtaining a doctorate in our discipline. Topics will include how to select a focus of study and a mentor, the typical timeline for completion of the degree, opportunities for funding and a general sense of what being a doctoral student is like. If you’re thinking you may be interested in a career in academia, now or in the future, this is the session for you!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to outline the typical sequence of steps in completing a research doctorate, consider the pros (and cons) of doctoral study and a research career, describe experiences and funding opportunities available for doctoral students in our field.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 32 - Trauma - How Language is Impacted

Cheryl Mann, LPC, LCSW, CPC, The Children's Place; Kathy Johnston, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Kansas Medical Center

When a child is suffering from ongoing trauma, he/she can present in many different ways. This session will help the participant understand the different forms of trauma and what happens to the brain when the child experiences trauma. Through video and slide presentations, the participants will be able to understand the impact of trauma on the developing child and different strategies that can be used to help the child remediate. A licensed clinical social worker and a speech-language pathologist team up to present the latest information to participants sharing more than 25 years of experience through a combination of both research and specific case studies.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to name at least three different types of trauma, list at least three different treatment options for immediate use within their practice and describe at least one major part of executive function.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

12:30 pm - 2:15 pm

Session 33 - President's Celebration - Rough Waters and Stormy Seas: A True Test of Leadership

Shelly Chabon, PhD, CCC-SLP, Portland State University

Our workplaces, whether in the public or private sector, are increasingly complicated by limited resources and heightened demands. This often results in conflict and unrest. As stress and anxiety grow, the role of a leader becomes of greater importance. We will consider why some leaders sink and others swim in times of strife and uncertainty and how effective leaders manage to thrive as turmoil around them ebbs and flows.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the characteristics of effective leadership, explore how to navigate leadership challenges and develop effective management strategies for resolving conflict.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Session 34 - Dementia Intervention: Maximizing Functional Outcomes, Part 1

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

Sooner or later, it will touch us all: our patients, family members or someone else close to us is diagnosed with dementia. With our population aging, we are more and more being swept into a flurry of daunting tasks to teach demented patient skills that are hard to come by. More importantly, we are ethically responsible for training the caregiver; training those who have the ultimate responsible for the patient. Knowing how the diseases of dementia unfold is an invaluable tool for success. Knowing HOW to do WHAT and WHEN to do it, depends on knowing what the patient needs and when they need it. We have a professional responsibility to assist the patient in achieving and maintaining their highest level of functioning, and this begins with the ability to accurately stage a patient’s dementia. Once a patient is staged, the needs of the patient can be easily seen. This innovative session presents a staging tool that clearly outlines, at each distinct stage, the patient’s abilities that remain and the patient’s lost abilities; this insight drives intervention. Attendees will discuss the top-evidence-based strategies and communication techniques in the field of dementia. You will leave this dynamic and collaborative session with the confidence and skills to develop a structured, systematic and highly individualized therapy program.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to accurately stage the patient with dementia or other cognitive impairments, utilize patient staging levels to design appropriate treatment interventions, demonstrate successful intervention of errorless learning techniques, spaced retrieval; montessori-based dementia programming; reminiscence therapy and the ability-based approach, implement validation therapy, reflective listening and re-direction to increase communication between you, the patient and the caregiver.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 35 - School-Age Language Assessment Best Practices: Integrating IDEA, State Guidelines, Evidence, Part 1

C. Melanie Schuele, PhD, CCC-SLP, Vanderbilt University

School speech-language pathologists must complete assessment with children for multiple reasons; determine eligibility, capture present levels of performance, measure progress on annual goals for progress reports, annual individualized education program (IEP) review, capture intervention session performance and validate dismissal from special education. Their assessments must help IEP teams understand how weak linguistics skills underlie individual children’s academic struggles. speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have many, many instruments and methods they can access to assess children. The challenge is for SLPs to align instruments and purposes. What questions drive my assessment activities? Which instrument(s) best addresses my question? The purpose of this session is to provide an update for clinicians on school-age language assessment. We will consider kindergarten through high school, with a focus on elementary school. We will begin by revisiting Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to consider how the federal law defines assessment and drives our assessment activities. Then we will think about the clinical questions that underlie each reason for assessment and how these questions inform the choice of assessment instruments or procedures. The goal of the presentation will be to consider how best to align instruments and clinical questions avoiding a one-size-fits-all perspective on commonly administered assessment instruments. We’ll also examine several state guidelines for speech-language assessment and consider whether these guidelines reflect principles of evidence-based assessment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the purposes of varying types of assessment activities that SLP conduct, describe how clinical marker assessments differ from norm-referenced assessments and choose instruments that align best with individual clinical questions.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

Session 36 - Language and Literacy: From the Parents Perspective (SLPs too)

Nancy Montgomery, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Pam Craft, MS, CCC-SLP, Butler School District

How does it feel to raise a child who struggles with language and literacy when the mother is a speech-language pathologist? This session will give you two different perspectives and will take you along on two families' journeys through early intervention in the home, early childhood special education, the individualized education program (IEP) process, outside resources and services in middle school. One family lives in a rural setting and one lives in an urban area so you will hear the differences in their stories. The joys and challenges of each step will be included. The role of various professionals will be highlighted and what was helpful and what was not helpful. Navigating the special education maze is difficult for every parent. These two parents understand the rules and procedures and therefore, are in a unique position to examine the process from the inside and the outside and provide some reminders about what makes effective intervention and what makes the special education process more family friendly. Learning to read is a complex process and the answers that these families found will be included.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify warning signs of early language and literacy difficulties, list strategies that are helpful for school-aged clients with language and literacy difficulties, identify parent-friendly practices for speech-language pathologists working with school-aged children and identify key components of effective assessment and intervention of children who have difficulty with literacy skills.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 37 - Making Waves With Dysphagia/Dementia Treatment and Collaboration

Michelle Vomund, MEd, Maryville University; Melissa Hynes, MHS, SSM, Rehabilitation Network St. Louis

Patients who have a dual diagnosis of dementia and dysphagia are complex yet common, and there are therapeutic approaches supported by the literature. This session focuses on best practices regarding clinical documentation, counseling, complex decision-making, a collaborative team approach and current healthcare trends. A brief overview will be provided on the stages of dementia with correlating dysphagia signs and symptoms, as supported by the recent literature. In-depth discussions and interactions, specifically with a dysphagia/dementia decision tree (Smith, Kindell, Baldwin, Waterman and Makin, 2009), will enhance learning. The speech-language pathologist (SLP) role in the end-of-life care team and collaboration with the other health professionals will be discussed, including each professional’s scope of practice. Participants will have an opportunity to use technology to participate in group discussions as well as to practice clinical rationale and decision-making regarding alternative nutrition/hydration (ANH) risks and benefits including against medical advice waivers (AMA) (Horner, 2016). Participants will develop a more comprehensive understanding of how to develop assessments and treatments for these complex patients.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to relate and apply current best practice guidelines and the SLP’s role in the dual diagnosis of dementia and dysphagia, develop interprofessional collaboration to ensure quality service and relate clinical information to facilitate functional outcomes for patients with a dual diagnosis of dementia and dysphagia and integrate current research regarding alternative nutrition/hydration in the dual diagnosis of dementia and dysphagia, construct documentation that will support their clinical decision making as well as providing all possible benefits and risks associated with against medical advice (AMA) diet waivers for individuals with the dual diagnosis.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 38 - Use the Clues: Differential Diagnosis and Intervention for Processing Disorders

Jeanane Ferre, PhD, CCC-A, Private Practice

Running speech can be conceptualized as a series of acoustic patterns to which we attach specific meaning. The listener must analyze, synthesize, attach meaning to and manipulate these patterns receptively and then must organize the information, plan and execute a response. A breakdown at any of these processing steps affects the communication and/or learning event. Assessment techniques are available – both formal and informal – that enable professionals to evaluate differentially the integrity of the process of processing; identifying specifically those skill areas that are deficient. This differential diagnosis leads to differential intervention in which deficit specific management strategies and treatment programs are implemented in order to reduce or resolve the specific deficit and minimize the deficit’s impact on the listener’s communication skills, academic success and sense of self. This advanced-level interactive session is appropriate for both audiologists and speech-language pathologists who have working knowledge of and/or clinical experience with auditory-language processing deficits among school-age children. The session begins with a brief overview of neuroscientific bases of processing and the tools available for assessment of processing skills. The session will focus on interpretation of assessment data and determination of client’s diagnostic profile. Functional impact of diagnosed deficits will be discussed in order to develop deficit-specific intervention plans that include management strategies and treatment goals that meet processing-specific needs and are aligned with educational standards for academics and speaking and listening.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to interpret results of processing assessments in order to identify areas of specific need, make referrals to appropriate personnel for additional assessment as needed, develop and implement effective management and treatment to minimize impact and reduce/resolve deficits and describe the roles/responsibilities of professionals in the multidisciplinary assessment and intervention of processing disorders.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 39 - Practical Applications for the Assessment and Treatment of Multilingual Populations, Part 3

Abby Eubank, MS, CCC-SLP; Sarah Sosland, MA, CCC-SLP, from Children's Mercy Kansas City

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify three actions that maximize the quality of sessions with interpreters, identify three strategies that can be used to repair breakdowns in sessions with interpreters and identify two functional intervention strategies that can be used effectively with culturally and linguistically diverse children and families.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

2:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Session 40 - Student Technical Sessions Part 2
4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Session 41 - Dementia Intervention: Maximizing Functional Outcomes, Part 2

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

Sooner or later, it will touch us all: our patients, family members or someone else close to us is diagnosed with dementia. With our population aging, we are more and more being swept into a flurry of daunting tasks to teach demented patient skills that are hard to come by. More importantly, we are ethically responsible for training the caregiver; training those who have the ultimate responsible for the patient. Knowing how the diseases of dementia unfold is an invaluable tool for success. Knowing HOW to do WHAT and WHEN to do it, depends on knowing what the patient needs and when they need it. We have a professional responsibility to assist the patient in achieving and maintaining their highest level of functioning, and this begins with the ability to accurately stage a patient’s dementia. Once a patient is staged, the needs of the patient can be easily seen. This innovative session presents a staging tool that clearly outlines, at each distinct stage, the patient’s abilities that remain and the patient’s lost abilities; this insight drives intervention. Attendees will discuss the top-evidence-based strategies and communication techniques in the field of dementia. You will leave this dynamic and collaborative session with the confidence and skills to develop a structured, systematic and highly individualized therapy program.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to accurately stage the patient with dementia or other cognitive impairments, utilize patient staging levels to design appropriate treatment interventions, demonstrate successful intervention of errorless learning techniques, spaced retrieval; montessori-based dementia programming; reminiscence therapy and the ability-based approach, implement validation therapy, reflective listening and re-direction to increase communication between you, the patient and the caregiver.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 42 - School-Age Language Assessment Best Practices: Integrating IDEA, State Guidelines, Evidence, Part 2

C. Melanie Schuele, Phd, CCC-SLP, Vanderbilt University

School speech-language pathologists must complete assessment with children for multiple reasons; determine eligibility, capture present levels of performance, measure progress on annual goals for progress reports, annual individualized education program (IEP) review, capture intervention session performance and validate dismissal from special education. Their assessments must help IEP teams understand how weak linguistics skills underlie individual children’s academic struggles. speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have many, many instruments and methods they can access to assess children. The challenge is for SLPs to align instruments and purposes. What questions drive my assessment activities? Which instrument(s) best addresses my question? The purpose of this session is to provide an update for clinicians on school-age language assessment. We will consider kindergarten through high school, with a focus on elementary school. We will begin by revisiting Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) to consider how the federal law defines assessment and drives our assessment activities. Then we will think about the clinical questions that underlie each reason for assessment and how these questions inform the choice of assessment instruments or procedures. The goal of the presentation will be to consider how best to align instruments and clinical questions avoiding a one-size-fits-all perspective on commonly administered assessment instruments. We’ll also examine several state guidelines for speech-language assessment and consider whether these guidelines reflect principles of evidence-based assessment.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the purposes of varying types of assessment activities that SLP conduct, describe how clinical marker assessments differ from norm-referenced assessments and choose instruments that align best with individual clinical questions.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

4:45 pm - 5:45 pm

Session 43 - Children’s Mercy Hospital Cochlear Implantation Program

Katie Kinicaid, AuD, CCC-A, FAAA, Children’s Mercy Hospital

This session will act as an overview to the Cochlear Implant Program at Children’s Mercy Hospital. Among the discussion will include the components to a cochlear implant candidacy evaluation and special considerations for single-sided deafness and medically complex patients. Current candidacy indications for children and special circumstances when patients have become candidates outside traditional guidelines will be discussed. To conclude, there will be several case study examples to incorporate topics covered.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify indications for cochlear implants for children 12-24 months of age, 24 months-17 years, and when exceptions have been requested for earlier implantation, describe special techniques for evaluating and programming complex cochlear implant patients/candidates and recall special considerations for medically complex cochlear implant patients from case study examples.

Session 44 - Finding Balance: Training Gender Congruent Voice and Communication

Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP; Katherine Layne, BS, from the University of Missouri

Speech-language professionals (SLPs) working with individuals identifying on the transgender continuum to modify gender perception of voice and communication must take a multifaceted and individualized intervention approach that is culturally sensitive and in concert with a client's gender identity and preferences. This session will explain modification and habituation of natural-sounding, gender-congruent pitch and pitch range and present techniques to foster appropriate gender-influenced resonance, articulation, intonation, language and non-verbal aspects of communication.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to discuss the importance of good vocal hygiene when training pitch, differentiate between masculine, gender-neutral and feminine vocal and communication behaviors, identify at least three target areas other than pitch that should be addressed to promote gender-congruent speech-language and communication and discuss the importance of using functional, personalized stimuli across all tasks.

Session 45 - NSSLHA Share Session

Greta Roettgen, BS, Truman State Universit; Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A, Truman State University; Dana Fritz, PhD, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri; Kim Stewart, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Central Missouri; Julie Meyer, B University of Missouri; Lauren Thomas O'Hare, BS, University of Missouri

National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NSSLHA) - How to have a successful NSSLHA Chapter? This session will provide NSSLHA information, executive board discussions, philanthropic ideas, information successful meetings/events, community service ideas, etc. Attendees should be NSSLHA Advisors and students interested in being a NSSLHA member.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to gain greater knowledge regarding participating in the NSSLHA executive boards, share successes and failures with philanthropic events and community service and improve knowledge concerning the national NSSLHA.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 46 - The Aging Swallow

Michelle Payne, MA, CCC-SLP, Saint Louis University-SLUCare

With age, there are changes to swallowing function which result from change in the structure, motility, coordination and sensitivity of the swallow process. These changes, in conjunction with other age-related conditions, may make older adults more vulnerable to developing dysphagia. Clinicians are increasingly tasked with evaluating the older adult and must be aware of normal features of swallowing in this population in order to determine whether the patient presents with dysphagia. This session will explore healthy age-related changes to swallow function to prepare the speech-language pathologist to evaluate and diagnose this population.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to explain the difference between a healthy older swallow versus a disordered swallow, identify three changes to swallow function with age and identify appropriate therapeutic approaches to treat elderly with dysphagia.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Sunday

7:15 am - 8:15 am

Session 47 - Poster Presentations - Part 3
8:15 am - 10:15 am

Session 48 - Aphasia Communication Theater: Changing the Tide for Aphasia Therapy

Melanie Schwartz, PhD, CCC-SLP, Maryville University

Maryville University Speech and Language Clinic created an innovative program called Aphasia Communication Theater (ACT) in which the clients starred in Wizard of Oz. Participation was offered first to those with aphasia, and was then extended to anyone else in the clinic. We had nine actors who had had strokes, one who had had a brain tumor, one with cerebral palsy and a few supporting actors who filled roles our clients chose not to fill. They had some combination of aphasia, apraxia, dysarthria, difficulty with executive functioning and memory loss. We received special permission from the theater licensing agency to modify the actors’ lines to meet their communication needs. The graduate student clinicians worked with the clients during their biweekly sessions and group rehearsals. The graduate clinicians adjusted lines, provided support on stage during the performances as needed, and found ways to accommodate their clients’ needs outside the therapy setting. The actors reported that the show gave them a sense of purpose, challenged them to gain new skills and was very rewarding. One actor said that instead of being ignored by cashiers and waitresses, he was on stage in a costume and makeup with stage lights in front of an audience that was applauding. ACT provided an incredible opportunity to the clients, graduate student clinicians and the community. This session will include information about the process for creating the show, roles of the students, impact on clients and response from the community. Actors may co-present.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe how an innovative theater program can transform the clinical experience for clients and clinicians, compare therapy in the clinic setting to a community-based experience, imagine how a similar program could be created for your clinic or university program and provide graduate student clinicians with a better understanding of functional therapy through authentic experiences.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 49 - The Independence Continuum: Increasing Communicative Competence in Young Children

Kimberly Gerth, MA, CCC-SLP; Kathryn Muskopf, MS, CCC-SLP, from Rockwood School District

The role of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) in preventing prompt dependence will be discussed, along with the crucial task of teaching colleagues on the early childhood team how to foster independence in children's communication skills. The general principles of the independence continuum, a program which is currently in draft and is undergoing limited pilot testing, will be presented. The independence continuum has been designed to increase communicative competence in young children who are at high risk for developing prompt dependence. Children on the autism spectrum, and/or those children who learn best through applied behavior analysis, are excellent candidates for participation. When provided with modeling and nonverbal prompting that is quickly faded, students are taught to initiate and respond appropriately during interactions with an adult communication partner. As skills become independent in an individualized setting, they are then generalized into peer interactions. The achievement of basic self-advocacy, which includes skills such as gaining attention appropriately, answering yes/no questions and expressing wants and needs, is a priority.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the risk factors that may lead to prompt dependence in young children, as well as strategies for preventing or reducing prompt dependence, describe the concept of basic self-advocacy and how it fosters communicative competence in young children, list the ways that the general principles of the independence continuum provide a framework for the child to initiate and respond appropriately during interactions with peers and adults in his/her environment and describe the role of the SLP in collaborating with other members of the early childhood team to create an environment which fosters independent communication skills.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Session 50 - Voice Boot Camp

Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP, Truman State University

Welcome to Voice Boot Camp! The purpose of this session is to provide attendees with background information on competencies needed to provide skilled assessment and treatment to persons with voice disorders. In a 2015 study, Teten, DeVeney and Friehe found that school-based clinicians in the state of Nebraska reported feeling more than moderately competent (a score of three on a one-five scale) on one out of 25 competencies related to assessing and treating persons with voice disorders. We will briefly discuss the survey data from that study. Great emphasis will be placed on reviewing and demonstrating evidence-based techniques regarding assessment and therapy techniques for voice clientele. Case study presentations will allow attendees to problem solve how they would use the techniques demonstrated. The hope is that clinicians will develop some new skills to use in their work settings on Monday morning!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to list at least five competencies related to the prevention, assessment and/or treatment of persons with voice disorders, identify both high and low-tech methods for assessing voice, demonstrate the use of and describe the rationale for at least five voice therapy techniques and demonstrate awareness of the evidence-base behind at least two voice therapy techniques.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

8:30 am - 10:00 am

Session 51 - Phonological Awareness, Decoding, Dyslexia: SLPs Who Promote Literacy Success, Part 1

C. Melanie Schuele, PhD, CCC-SLP, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

The evidence base provides speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and other educators with a clear path to optimize children’s word decoding and spelling outcomes. Critically, struggling learners, including children with speech-language impairment (S-LI), need a strong base of phonological awareness upon which to build decoding and spelling. The research is clear that SLPs are the educational team member best-suited to lead their colleagues in building children’s phonological awareness. Teaching children to read and write is a team sport, particular when considering the needs of struggling learners and continued evolution of multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS). Each student must draw on his/her linguistic foundation of primary language skills (e.g., syntax, semantics) and metalinguistic skills (e.g., phonological awareness) to obtain the reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency needed for school success. SLPs should be critical members of the literacy team; however, many SLPs struggle to define their literacy team role, even for children who receive speech-language services. The purpose of this session is to walk participants down a path that leads them to become SLPs who promote literacy success. Along this path we’ll discuss the literacy learning needs of children with S-LI, the characteristics of teams who meet the needs of struggling learners, the research that supports the unique (and overlapping) SLPs’ contributions on literacy teams, the SLPs’ assessment contributions in pinpointing and describing the struggling learners’ literacy needs and how teams collaboratively meet the varied needs of individual children. Participants will leave with a well-defined plan to become stronger members of literacy teams.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe their unique and overlapping expertise as compared to other literacy team members, define the use of multiple measures of phonological awareness useful for identification and program planning and explain how they will advance the literacy skills of students in their schools, particularly the children for whom they provide speech-language services.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 52 - The Functional Practice of Dysphagia, Part 1

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

Swallowing is a delicate process that can be easily disturbed. It is not a disease in itself but a condition brought on by many causes. The primary goal of treatment for swallowing disorders is to improve the amount and variety of food and liquid swallowed orally while minimizing the risk of aspiration and related complications. This informative and practical session, presents a comprehensive view of assessments and treatments of the intricate swallowing process. Multiple dysphagia assessments, as well as clinical, structural and function esophageal assessments are identified and discussed. Swallow treatment strategies, indirect techniques for management and direct techniques for changing the pattern of the swallow, are outlined specifically reflecting purpose. Step-by-step instructions of compensatory strategies, postural adjustments, maneuvers and exercises are presented with rational for functional use. Goal samples for specific swallow disorders are offered that meet medicare regulations. The foundation of treatment is based on understanding the nature of the swallowing process; the main theme of this session is to correctly identify the precise swallowing disorder(s) followed by identifying the effective treatment strategies!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the foundation for dysphagia treatment by understanding the nature of the swallow disorder(s), distinguish between structural and functional esophageal dysphagia disorders and discuss treatment interventions, specify step-by-step directions for all compensatory strategies, postural adjustments maneuvers and exercises with explanation of purpose and rational for function and identify risk factors for aspiration pneumonia and the substantial role of oral hygiene.

Level of Learning: Advanced

10:30 am - 11:30 am

Session 53 - We Read to Know We’re not Alone: Aphasia Book Clubs

Barbara Meyer, MA, CCC-SLP, from Fontbonne University; Jessica Lynn Cochran, BS; Amanda Eaton, PhD, CCC-SLP

One of the major concerns heard from aphasia clients is that they desire to read and to have the confidence to discuss what they have read with others. This session will provide an overview of using a “book club” model as a vehicle for group therapy for aphasia clients. Throughout the session, we will discuss the benefits of this model in areas of language and cognition. Favorable settings for aphasia book clubs will be described. Information on resources that facilitate aphasia book clubs will be provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to discuss the benefits of using book clubs as a vehicle for group therapy, describe favorable settings for book clubs as group therapy and identify resources that facilitate group therapy.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Session 54 - Phonological Awareness, Decoding, Dyslexia: SLPs Who Promote Literacy Success, Part 2

C. Melanie Schuele, CCC-SLP, Vanderbilt University Medical Center

The evidence base provides speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and other educators with a clear path to optimize children’s word decoding and spelling outcomes. Critically, struggling learners, including children with speech-language impairment (S-LI), need a strong base of phonological awareness upon which to build decoding and spelling. The research is clear that SLPs are the educational team member best-suited to lead their colleagues in building children’s phonological awareness. Teaching children to read and write is a team sport, particular when considering the needs of struggling learners and continued evolution of multi-tiered systems of support (MTSS). Each student must draw on his/her linguistic foundation of primary language skills (e.g., syntax, semantics) and metalinguistic skills (e.g., phonological awareness) to obtain the reading, writing, speaking and listening proficiency needed for school success. SLPs should be critical members of the literacy team; however, many SLPs struggle to define their literacy team role, even for children who receive speech-language services. The purpose of this session is to walk participants down a path that leads them to become SLPs who promote literacy success. Along this path we’ll discuss the literacy learning needs of children with S-LI, the characteristics of teams who meet the needs of struggling learners, the research that supports the unique (and overlapping) SLPs’ contributions on literacy teams, the SLPs’ assessment contributions in pinpointing and describing the struggling learners’ literacy needs and how teams collaboratively meet the varied needs of individual children. Participants will leave with a well-defined plan to become stronger members of literacy teams.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe their unique and overlapping expertise as compared to other literacy team members, define the use of multiple measures of phonological awareness useful for identification and program planning and explain how they will advance the literacy skills of students in their schools, particularly the children for whom they provide speech-language services.

Level of Learning: Advanced

Session 55 - The Functional Practice of Dysphagia, Part 2

Jane Yakel, MS, CCC-SLP, Self-Employed

Swallowing is a delicate process that can be easily disturbed. It is not a disease in itself but a condition brought on by many causes. The primary goal of treatment for swallowing disorders is to improve the amount and variety of food and liquid swallowed orally while minimizing the risk of aspiration and related complications. This informative and practical session, presents a comprehensive view of assessments and treatments of the intricate swallowing process. Multiple dysphagia assessments, as well as clinical, structural and function esophageal assessments are identified and discussed. Swallow treatment strategies, indirect techniques for management and direct techniques for changing the pattern of the swallow, are outlined specifically reflecting purpose. Step-by-step instructions of compensatory strategies, postural adjustments, maneuvers and exercises are presented with rational for functional use. Goal samples for specific swallow disorders are offered that meet medicare regulations. The foundation of treatment is based on understanding the nature of the swallowing process; the main theme of this session is to correctly identify the precise swallowing disorder(s) followed by identifying the effective treatment strategies!

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the foundation for dysphagia treatment by understanding the nature of the swallow disorder(s), distinguish between structural and functional esophageal dysphagia disorders and discuss treatment interventions, specify step-by-step directions for all compensatory strategies, postural adjustments maneuvers and exercises with explanation of purpose and rational for function and identify risk factors for aspiration pneumonia and the substantial role of oral hygiene.

Level of Learning: Advanced

10:30 am - 12:30 pm

Session 56 - Finishing Strong: Clinical Fellowship Decision-Making

Gwen Nolan, MS, CCC-SLP, University of Missouri

This session is designed for graduate students and focuses on the importance of making good professional decisions when choosing a clinical fellowship (CF) practice setting. A brief overview of potential practice settings, the importance of the CF mentor relationship, how to find a job and common pitfalls to avoid will be explored. Understanding that the CF represents the final piece of a new clinician's education will be emphasized.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to describe three potential CF practice settings, identify three ways to find a CF position, explain two elements of a successful CF-mentor relationship and identify two positive and two negative signs when weighing a job offer.

Level of Learning: Introductory

Session 57 - SMART Goals for Social Communication: Writing, Tracking and Enlisting Collaboration

Shannon Locke, MS, CCC-SLP, MSU/MO-DESE - Project ACCESS

This session will be a discussion of real world outcomes for the individuals we serve in schools and outpatient therapy identified as having autism. Thinking in terms of lifetime outcomes for independence, income and happy adult lives, we will explore best practice in writing goals to address social-communication and other necessary soft skills for employability. Methods to write goals that merge Missouri learning standards with non-academic targeted skills will be reviewed. There will also be a review of how to prioritize goals, clearly define target skills and the supports necessary for successful outcomes and determine noninvasive data collection methods to guide intervention. We will also look at creating rubrics and other methods to help enlist individual self-evaluation and encourage data collection by other educators or providers across multiple settings.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to advocate for goals to support social-communication and soft skills beyond academics based on national statistics and movements in intervention for individuals with autism, write clearly defined SMART goals for social-communication and other soft skills that align with Missouri learning standards and determine data collection methods appropriate for the goals written that can also be easily collected by the students themselves and/or other educators or providers working with our students.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

11:45 am - 12:45 pm

Session 58 - Ob-la-di, Ob-la-da, Life Goes On: Starting an Aphasia Choir

Aphasia choirs enable individuals with aphasia exhibiting communication deficits to participate in a community-based activity with others of similar abilities in an inviting and fun environment. Aphasia choirs benefit those with aphasia by incorporating melodic intonation therapy with a social activity that allows the development of a new skill while building self-confidence. The focus of this session includes the benefits of an aphasia choir and how to initiate an aphasia choir within a community. The first half of the session will explain the various ways aphasia choir benefits its participants in the areas of therapy, learning new a new skill and building self-confidence in community-based setting. The last portion of the session will explain the steps to starting a choir including recruiting participants and volunteers, procuring a rehearsal space, scheduling of practices and selecting appropriate repertoire for participants. A sample of a performance by a current aphasia choir will be provided.

Learner Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to identify the benefits of music in aphasia therapy, contrast the risks/benefits of social isolation/social engagement in aphasia recovery and explain the steps to starting an aphasia choir including recruiting appropriate participants and volunteers, scheduling logistics and selecting appropriate repertoire and supports for participants.

Level of Learning: Intermediate

Student Technical Sessions

Friday, April 6, 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm

ST 1 - Utilizing LENA Technology in Early Intervention

Brooke Prigge, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Lynne Shields, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F

Numerous research studies have validated the importance of enhancing the early language environment to promote cognitive linguistic development in young children. The Language Environment Analysis (LENA) system allows for objective language sample collection in a child’s natural environment through speech recognition technology. The LENA system provides quantitative information regarding adult language input, child vocalization output, conversational turns and audio environment. The purpose of this presentation is to compare the results of LENA developmental age analyses with standardized assessments and evaluate LENA technology as a tool for parent coaching in early intervention. Three children with expressive language delay, ages 2;11 to 3;6, participated in four data collection recording posters across an eight-month period. Recordings and analyses are currently underway.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to describe the process of using LENA technology to collect a language sample, identify clinical uses of LENA technology in early intervention and compose treatment objectives based on the results of LENA developmental age analyses.

ST 2 - Reported Practices of SLPs Working With Diverse Users of AAC

Claire Gunn, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Gale Rice, PhD, CCC-SLP

Current literature outlines the differentiated practice required with diverse students in terms of their socioeconomic status, English language ability, LGBTQ status, race or ethnicity and chronic medical conditions. There is a gap in the literature that discusses evaluation and treatment of diverse students who use alternative and augmentative communication (AAC). A study was conducted in which practicing speech-language patholgists (SLPs) were surveyed about their experience in parent training, evaluation and treatment of diverse users of AAC and how their graduate level education and continued education prepared them to treat these students. The results of this survey will be discussed and recommendations will be made for how the results will impact SLP education and practice within the field.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to identify the aspects of diversity that affect AAC intervention and practice, describe ways in which SLPs have altered their practice with diverse users of AAC and list the recommended next steps in research and practice.

ST 3 - What do Mental Health Professionals Know About Aphasia?

Ian Farmer, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Amanda Eaton, PhD, CCC-SLP

People with aphasia are at risk for experiencing depression, anxiety, isolation, grief, identity change and marriage problems, as well as many other social and emotional difficulties. Mental health services may be warranted for individuals in this population. However, given that these services are primarily delivered through communication, efficacy of referring people with severe communication disorders to standard licensed counselors or psychologies is in question. The purpose of this study is to determine the level of knowledge licensed Missouri counselors and psychologists have concerning aphasia to empower speech-language pathologists to make informed choices during their referral process. The study outlines current research on mental health practices and risks for people with aphasia and compares counselors’ and psychologists’ scores from an aphasia knowledge questionnaire.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to identify mental-emotional health risks for people with aphasia, select mental health professionals with the most robust knowledge of aphasia and identify areas of further research.

ST 4 - Gene Therapy for Dysphagia in a Mouse Model of ALS

Ellyn Andel, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Teresa Lever, PhD, CCC-SLP

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal disease characterized by degeneration of motor neurons and muscles, including those necessary for swallowing. Currently, no cure for ALS exists and treatments to date increase survival by only a few months. To hasten progress toward finding effective treatments, our lab has been studying the SOD1-G93A transgenic mouse model of ALS that develops progressive dysphagia, tongue weakness and severe weight loss. We hypothesize that solely treating the tongue in SOD1 mice will preserve swallowing function and prolong survival. At six weeks of age, 12 SOD1-G93A mice (both sexes) received a single injection of gene therapy (AAVrh10-miRSOD1) into the tongue. Another 24 mice were divided into two control groups (12 SOD1-G93A mice and 12 non-transgenic littermates; both sexes) that received a single intralingual vehicle injection. Beginning at three months of age, videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) testing was performed twice monthly until disease end-stage. Videos are currently being analyzed by two reviewers in blinded fashion to quantify several swallow metrics (e.g., lick rate and swallow rate). Preliminary results show that dysphagia was less severe for treated than untreated transgenic mice at disease end-stage. Moreover, treated mice had extended survival. Thus, the therapeutic potential of intralingual gene therapy for dysphagia in ALS is indeed promising. If similar beneficial outcomes (i.e., preserved swallowing function and extended survival) continue to emerge from our ongoing study, this work will provide proof of efficacy for using this targeted gene therapy approach for dysphagia in ALS patients.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to recognize the importance of using animal models in dysphagia research, identify symptoms of dysphagia in ALS and discuss a potential therapy for dysphagia in ALS.

ST 5 - A Novel Rodent Model Mimicking Dysphagia in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Erika Murphy, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Teresa Lever, PhD, CCC-SLP

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating disease that results in dysphagia due to weakness of the tongue and other cranial muscles essential to swallowing. Impaired tongue strength in particular is an independent prognostic indicator of shorter survival in ALS patients. Despite this knowledge, therapeutic strategies specifically targeting the tongue have not been the focus of ALS research. The overarching goal of this project is to identify compensatory mechanisms that trigger enhanced plasticity (i.e., increased motor output) in the hypoglossal nucleus, a brainstem region that directly innervates the tongue via the hypoglossal nerve. Enhanced plasticity may enable preservation of hypoglossal function and swallowing capacity in ALS patients. However, it is difficult to study hypoglossal plasticity since the amount and rate at which motor neuron death occurs cannot be controlled in ALS rodent models, and degeneration is not limited to the hypoglossal motor nucleus. Thus, we have developed a novel model (cholera toxin B conjugated to saporin; CTB-SAP) of hypoglossal motor neuron death that mimics the behavioral phenotype of dysphagia observed in ALS models. Sprague Dawley male rats received intralingual injections of conjugated CTB-SAP (25 g; n=11) or un-conjugated CTB-SAP (control; n=11) into the genioglossal muscle. Swallowing function was assessed via videofluoroscopic swallow studies at baseline and eight days post-injection. Compared to controls, treated rats exhibited significant (p<0.05) deficits in lick and swallow rates. This novel model will serve as a platform to investigate new treatment strategies aimed at preserving swallowing function, quality of life and survival time for ALS patients.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to recognize the importance of including animal models in research, explain signs and symptoms of dysphagia in ALS and discuss emerging therapeutics for dysphagia in ALS.

ST 6 - Control Groups Versus Normative Comparisons of Language for International Adoptees

Samantha Sudduth, Saint Louis University
Supervisor: Deborah Hwa-Froelich, PhD, CCC-SLP

Children who are adopted internationally (CAI) undergo an interrupted process of language acquisition. This unique pattern presents a significant challenge when it comes to the assessment of the language abilities of international adoptees. Assessment is particularly difficult in the first few years following arrival in the adoptive country, during which it can be difficult to discern whether or not CAI have a language delay or impairment. Prior research has shown great variability within the language outcomes of CAI, with some researchers reporting typical language skills one-two years post-adoption, and others reporting higher rates of language impairment among CAI than among non-adopted children of the same age. Researchers who have assessed language outcomes among international adoptees have commonly reported poorer outcomes when CAI are compared to control groups of their peers rather than to published normative data. This study examines the language skills of 27 six-year-old children adopted from Asia and eastern Europe before two years of age, and compares their language outcomes on a standardized English-language measure to both a control group of peers and to normative data. The results of this analysis are currently in progress.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to describe post adoption language outcomes for children adopted internationally, discuss the different comparison groups in research with children adopted internationally and describe how to clinically interpret language outcomes of children adopted internationally.

ST 7 - Inferences in Reading Comprehension of Children With Language Impairment

Claire Elliott, BS, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Sara Steele, PhD, CCC-SLP

Children with language impairment often perform poorly on reading comprehension tasks compared to typically developing peers. However, few studies have considered the role of different question types on reading comprehension assessment. For example, on the gray oral reading tests-4 (GORT-4), reading comprehension for each passage is assessed through five multiple-choice questions that require the reader to recall and infer information from the passage. For this project, GORT-4 questions were categorized into literal and inferential subtypes. Next, children's performance on each subtype was calculated. Children with language impairment (n=12) were compared to children with typical language (n=11), to determine whether the presence of language impairment differentially affected performance on reading comprehension question subtypes. Clinical implications for assessment and intervention will be examined.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to describe language processes that are important for reading comprehension, examine different types of inferences that children must make while reading and explore how children with language impairment perform on reading comprehension questions that require different types of inferences.

ST 8 - Gender Differences in the Language of Children's Literature

Maggie Bill, BS, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Sara Steele, PhD, CCC-SLP

Gender differences are noticeable in children’s literature. For example, girl-oriented books are more likely to have princess themes, whereas boy-oriented books are more likely to have adventure themes. Gender differences in dialogue addressed to and produced by boys and girls have also been demonstrated. However, research is lacking in how language specifically differs by gender in these stories. For this study, 12 picture books were selected: four with a female leading character, four with a male leading character and four neutral (e.g., male and female leading characters). The text was transcribed and categorized as content or dialogue. Language measures for lexical diversity, syntactic complexity and discourse features were calculated. Comparisons were made among book types and between content and dialogue. Results will reveal whether gender differences are present in the language of children’s literature and how this relates to the spoken language of each gender.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to identify gender differences in the language of children’s literature, identify how boys and girls differ in linguistic style in spoken language and discuss implications of specific language used on gender bias or gender identity.

ST 9 - Family Stress and Support Level and Assessment of Child’s Development

Maddie Bell, Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD

The potential link between stress, level of support in a family and the caregiver’s ability to accurately assess speech and language development was explored in this study. Sixty caregivers of children aged birth to three were given a survey that requested information regarding level of stress and support, as well as ask questions regarding the current development of their child(ren). The data gathered serves to answer the following questions: Does stress correlate with the quality and presence of social networks in an individual’s life? Does a parent’s stress level correlate with their ability to accurately assess their child(ren)’s development?

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to list two factors that affect a parent’s ability to accurately assess their child’s development, describe how lack of a supportive network can negatively impact a parent/caregiver and identify three different types of family support.

ST 10 - Training Students Providing Literacy Education for Families Living in Poverty

Nicole Tonkovic; Valerie Hagedorn, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A

There are many families in the United States living with very little support, financial resources and in impoverished conditions. It is important that healthcare providers understand the issues that so many face each day. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a training poster for volunteers that will be providing literacy education to families living in poverty. The level of comfort and knowledge was examined based on volunteer responses. The quality of information and effectiveness of information provided was also examined based on parent responses obtained during a community outreach event.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to identify techniques and skills used to train volunteers working with families living in poverty, describe different strategies in effective provision of literacy education to parent and describe three reasons early childhood literacy education is important for families.

ST 11 - Survey of Undergraduate Transformational Experiences

Adriana Arabas; Abigail Menke; Kelsey Collins, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Illene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A

The purpose of this poster was to collect information regarding the common transformational experiences in undergraduate communication disorders (CMD) majors. The poster also looked at the associated stress level that was experienced while participating in these activities. Participants were asked to fill out a survey that looked at the types of opportunities that were considered transformational and to rate their stress level during that time.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to define transformational experiences, list three opportunities that CMDS majors at Truman State University have access to and describe the impact that high stress levels have on undergraduate students.

ST 13 - Exploring the Link Between Pragmatic Language Skills and Social Competence

Ama Idun, Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A

Effective communication relies on more than word choice, since pragmatic language (PL) is influential on how a message is perceived. This study examines the connection between PL (i.e. nonverbal behavior) and social competence (SC), treating each as variables in an exploratory research design. It was hypothesized that more appropriate and consistent use of PL will be observed among individuals with high self-reported SC scores. Participants (n = 25) were observed conversing in small groups, then were administered the social competence questionnaire (SCQ) to assess their score. Using statistical analysis to determine correlations, the results revealed a strong relationship between using gestures and emotional regulation, a single domain out of five assessed on the SCQ. The current results suggest that pragmatic language skills may not influence all areas of SC equally.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to define social competence, describe the significance of social competence and how it impacts quality of life and identify pragmatic skills that are associated with higher levels of social competence.

ST 14 - The Relationship Between Pediatric Asthma and Pediatric Communication Disorders

Laura Magerkurth, BA, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Carlotta Kimble, PhD, CCC-SLP

Communication disorders and asthma are common childhood conditions, each affecting about eight percent of children. While evidence has suggested there is no link between asthma and communication disorders, other researchers have concluded that they are significantly correlated. As both pediatric asthma and pediatric communication disorders can both negatively impact health-related quality of life, investigation into the relationship between the two is warranted. The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between pediatric communication disorders and asthma and further, whether a relationship exists between severity of pediatric asthma and severity of pediatric communication disorders.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to identify the comorbid conditions that frequently occur for children with asthma and children with communication disorders, discuss the relationship between pediatric asthma and communication disorders and identify other common medical conditions that commonly co-occur with communication disorders.

Student Technical Sessions

Saturday, April7, 2:30 pm to 5:30 pm

ST 12 - Exploring the Relationship Between Language Ability and Expository Discourse Production

Anna Guilkey, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Stacy Wagovich, PhD, CCC-SLP

Expository discourse is language used to impart information (Bliss, 2002). Children encounter expository discourse daily in the classroom. Therefore, skilled understanding and use of expository language is necessary to succeed academically. This technical session investigated expository discourse production in nine- to 12-year-old children with a range of language abilities. In particular, it explored two areas currently missing from the literature on expository language development in the school-age years. First, it examined how expository language compares when children generate their own explanations about their favorite game or sport, versus when they retell a scientific explanation presented to them via video. Second, the study examined how providing supports for (i.e., scaffolding) the production of both tasks, by giving organizational cues and time to plan explanations, facilitates expository discourse production. Twenty-six typically developing children participated in this study, producing two expository language samples (generation and retelling), and completing language and vocabulary testing. Hypotheses were that children’s language abilities would be significantly and positively related to the strength of their expository samples and that all children would produce stronger expository samples in the generation condition than in the retelling condition, because of greater familiarity with the content of the generation condition. Although this session focuses on children with typical language skills, the emphasis on scaffolding will have implications for future study of children with language impairment, as this information will help educators and speech-language pathologists know how best to support children’s acquisition of expository language skills needed to succeed academically.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to define expository discourse, identify two tasks that can be used to assess expository language skills in school-age children and summarize the relationship between school-age children’s language ability and expository discourse production in two scaffolded tasks.

ST 15 - Aphasia and Transcoding: When 145 is said, "154"

Aubrey Atwater, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Amanda Eaton, PhD, CCC-SLP

The current literature suggests that individuals with aphasia have compromised abilities for transcoding numbers (i.e. alphanumeric form to digit form, vice versa) in both verbal and written form due to their language deficits. However, limited research is available regarding the type of errors an individual with aphasia will experience when transcoding numbers. This skill is vital for performing extended activities of daily living and can reduce an individual's level of independence post-stroke. The purpose of this study is to characterize errors within each aphasia subtype in two modalities (i.e. verbal vs. written form). The input of number stimuli can greatly influence an individual with aphasia's ability to express or comprehend a quantifiable amount. Concomitant cognitive/linguistic behaviors in aphasia (i.e. types of paraphasias, confrontational naming abilities, non-verbal intelligence) also can be used to predict deficits in transcoding. The data collected from this study is the first step in making informed clinical decisions and practices in regards to rehabbing number deficits post-stroke.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to define transcoding and its role in extended activities of daily living, identify cognitive/linguistic behaviors that may attribute to transcoding errors and identify the impact of presentation style (alphanumeric form vs. digit form) on number production (verbal vs. written).

ST 16 - Measures of English Syntax in Mlingual and Multilingual Writers

Loren Kreher, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Carmen Russell, PhD, CCC-SLP

Diversity in the United States is increasing, thus increasing the need for information about the language learning development of both typical and atypical learners. The development of second language learning is extremely complex, with both external factors and internal factors influencing the rate and quality of that learning. The pattern of sequential second language learning is uneven across domains, with some language skills, such as narrative structure, reaching age-level norms faster than more language-specific structures, such as syntax and morphosyntax. The presence of language disorder complicates this further. Additionally, difficulty learning the advanced syntax needed for upper-level academic writing tasks, in which syntax is one of the primary tools for the organization and presentation of thought, presents a major hurdle for academic achievement. This study focuses on measures of syntactic correctness, complexity and length in the writing of monolingual and multilingual students, both with and without language learning disorders.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to describe internal and external factors that can influence the development of a second language, recall the three major categories of syntactic measurements and name the specific procedures commonly used within those categories and name the differences in syntactic development that can signal the presence of a language learning disorder in ELLs.

ST 17 - Identifying the Pathological Neural Regions Contributing to Dysphagia

Ian Deninger, BS; Brayton Ballenger, BS; Alexis Ruffolo, BS; Kazutaka Takahashi, PhD, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Teresa Lever, PhD, CCC-SLP

Dysphagia is a debilitating comorbidity of numerous neurological diseases such as stroke, Parkinson’s and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Unfortunately, treatment for dysphagia is palliative instead of preventative/curative because the affected neurological regions and pathophysiological mechanisms are largely unknown and are likely different for each disease. As a result, dysphagia often leads to malnutrition, dehydration and aspiration pneumonia, all of which are linked to early mortality. To address this clinical problem, we are developing a diagnostic tool to reliably identify the pathological regions in the brain of mouse models of neurological diseases, for future translation to humans. Thus-far, we have established methodology to evoke swallowing in anesthetized mice using two stimulation approaches: fictive (electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve) versus natural (citric acid delivered into the pharynx). Neural electroencephalography (EEG) and muscle electromyography (EMG) activity was recorded from electrodes inserted subcutaneously or surgically implanted at various head and neck locations. EEG activity time locked to swallow events was averaged to extract a swallow evoked potential (SwEP) waveform corresponding to neural generator sources. Both fictive and natural stimuli reliably evoked swallowing. However, fictive stimulation produced marked artifact that masked SwEP detection. In contrast, natural stimuli resulted in a SwEP waveform with five distinct peaks. Protocol refinement is ongoing to improve repeatability. Once established, our SwEP protocol has the potential to identify the pathological neural substrates contributing to dysphagia in each disease, and to quantify response to targeted treatments. Thus, this animal research may lead to novel and effective treatments for dysphagia in humans.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to recognize the importance of including animal models in research, explain fictive versus natural stimuli that can evoke swallowing and discuss how identification of the pathological neural regions contributing to dysphagia may lead to the discovery of new treatments.

ST 18 - Smartphone App for Early Detection and Monitoring of Oromotor Dysfunction

Elise Henn, BS; Yang Yang Wang, MS; Joshua Ehrich; Derek Kedigh, MS; Minguang Song, MS; Tuo Zhao, BS; Mili Kuruvilla-Dugdale, PhD; Filiz Bunyak, PhD; Yunxin Zhao, PhD; Teresa Lever, PhD, CCC-SLP, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Teresa Lever, PhD, CCC-SLP

Our lab previously collected data on 140 healthy participants (equal genders), ages 20-89 years old, using two lingual diadochokinetic (DDK) tasks that elicit distinct acoustic waveforms. One was a speech DDK task (“tuh”) and the other was a novel non-speech DDK task (“tongue tick”), three 15-sec trials each. Results showed that performance on both tasks declined with advancing age; however, tongue tick rate was significantly more affected than speech rate. This finding suggests our novel tongue tick task holds promise as an early detection tool for lingual dysfunction contributing to speech and swallowing impairment. While data collection was quick to perform, objective manual data analysis was labor intensive and impractical for use in clinical practice. To overcome this barrier, we have been developing a smartphone app to automatically detect and count DDK events from acoustic and visual recordings. Agreement between manual and fully automated counts is currently 80% but improves to 100% with user interaction. While manual analysis requires up to two hours per participant, fully automated analysis is completed in less than two seconds. When user interaction is needed to resolve discrepancies, the analysis time is approximately two minutes. App refinement is ongoing, and targeted improvements include computation of DDK features beyond DDK rate, such as rhythm, fatigue and production accuracy. We are also expanding our focus beyond the tongue, to include a variety of audio and/or visual oromotor tasks routinely used in clinical practice. Testing of clinical populations is currently underway with our app to evaluate diagnostic utility.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to explain the current clinical tools available for detection and monitoring of oromotor dysfunction, describe the decline in speech and swallow function associated with healthy aging versus disease conditions and identify the reasons why a smartphone app for early detection and monitoring of oromotor dysfunction will be beneficial in clinical settings, and how we are working toward this goal.

ST 19 - What Patient Characteristics Best Predict Compliance to the ClEAR Program?

Joseph Nothstine, BS, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Maureen Fischer, AuD, CCC-A

Patients seeking treatment for hearing-related communication difficulties are often disappointed with the eventual outcomes, even after they receive a hearing aid or other hearing device. An approach that audiologists have used to help enhance positive communication outcomes is to provide auditory training (AT). Over the recent years, the field has evolved their training to implement different online programs in an attempt to increase patient compliance and satisfaction with their eventual outcomes. Unfortunately, compliance rates for completing these programs, including those online, have consistently been low.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to identify the advantages of implementing aural rehabilitation in practice, distinguish characteristics of the average/successful ClEAR program users and differentiate the advantages of implementing the ClEAR program into practice.

ST 20 - Evaluation of Missouri EHDI Program and Implementations Improving LFU/LTD

Joseph Nothstine, BS, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Maureen Fischer, AuD

Early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) in Missouri mandates that every infant born subsequent of January 1, 2002, be screened for hearing loss, using procedures approved by the Department of Health. This requirement, as part of the universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) program in the United States, has continued to develop and evolve into an efficacious agenda that identifies those children who may be born with or develop hearing loss. Inopportunely, the most recent national data available from the Center for Disease Control (2014) show that a staggering 34.4% of those infants not passing the initial screening are classified as Loss to follow-upl(LFU) or loss to documentation (LTD). In Missouri, of the 76,725 births reported by vital record, a remarkable 97.9% were screened and a modest 8% of those referred were classified as LFU/LTD. In this study, the aims are to examine and evaluate reasons the state of Missouri has been so successful as compared to national averages of LFU/LTD and explore possible solutions for reducing this percentage to match the 0% of LFU/LTD reported by states such as Delaware, Vermont and Wyoming.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to implement learned skills into practice to ensure quality of care, have a better understanding of best audiological practices, identify future implementation techniques for better client adherence and describe client perspective of process following referral from newborn hearing screening.

ST 21 - Language and Pragmatic Skills of School-Age Children During Different Play

Elise Abel, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Sara Steele, MA, CCC-SLP

In the context of play, children use language and pragmatic skills to plan, negotiate and dialogue. Different forms of play (e.g., parallel, associative, cooperative) require different language skills. This project aimed to identify language differences in two play contexts: traditional associative play and electronic associative play. Four dyads of school-age children participated in traditional play with Legos and electronic play with minecraft. Language samples during each play type were gathered, transcribed and analyzed for semantic, syntactic, morphologic and pragmatic measures. Comparisons between traditional and electronic play were made. Results will inform our understanding of the language skills required for successful interaction in contemporary play environments.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to identify language skills that are required for different play types, identify social skills needed for successful traditional play and electronic play and describe various roles that traditional and electronic play can serve in furthering the development of language skills in school-age children.

ST 22 - Evaluation of an Early Head Start Screening Protocol

Leah Bell; Christine Bollinger, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A

Children who are enrolled in the early head start program are required to receive an annual speech/language/hearing screening. The Truman State Speech and Hearing Clinic provides this service to those in our area as well as surrounding counties. This research project analyzes the hearing screening process at Truman State’s Speech and Hearing Clinic. Surveys were distributed to parents of children who failed their hearing screening in order to evaluate three essential questions: Are parents receiving sufficient information? Do parents understand the information they receive? Are parents taking the suggested course of action?

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to identify three important components of an information giving interaction following a speech/language/hearing screening, identify what steps parents are expected to take after receiving a failed hearing screening report and list three components of the hearing screening process for children enrolled in early head start.

ST 23 - Impact of Caretaker Training on Accuracy of AAC Use

John Fletcher, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Gale Rice, PhD, CCC-SLP

Children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) to communicate face a variety of challenges with regard to acquiring and functionally using their communication systems. Families of children who use AAC are typically directly involved with their use in the home and, in many cases, at school and in the community. Thus, many caretakers assume very active rolls in helping their children learn to use these systems. This study was conducted in order to determine how much training caretakers of individuals who use AAC are given and to demonstrate if a there was a positive correlation between caretaker training and system-use within the home. In order to determine the amount of training caretakers received on AAC devices, data was collected through questionnaires. The accuracy of device use by AAC users was assessed in technical posters in which participants were asked to initiate a greeting, locate specific pages/selections on their devices and make requests using a provided overlay of symbols.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to identify barriers and facilitators to the use of AAC devices in the home, explain the correlation between caretaker training and accuracy of AAC device use and summarize presented caretaker perceptions of AAC devices.

ST 24 - Personality Traits of College Students Relating to Glottal Fry

Erynn Skoglund, BS; Cassidy Stoner, BS, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this research was to determine if there were certain personality traits which predict the presence of glottal fry. In addition, the researchers wanted to determine if hours of extracurricular involvement, level of hydration, amount of sleep or vocal habits impacted the presence of glottal fry. Participants were asked to complete a demographic survey, items related to involvement on a college campus, a survey related to vocal habits and the 16 personality factor questionnaire, 16PF, personality quiz (Cattell, Eber, and Tatsuoka, 1970). The first two tools were designed by the researchers while the second pair of tools were adapted from published works. Conversational samples and reading samples for each participant were subjectively evaluated for presence of glottal fry. Data collected was evaluated for participation patterns and/or personality traits that best predicted presence of glottal fry. Results will be verbally and graphically portrayed.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this technical session, the participants will be able to identify what level of involvement in collegiate activities, if any, influence the use of glottal fry, identify vocal habits, if any, that influence the use of glottal fry, identify dominant personality traits, if any, which influence glottal fry and identify the prevalence of glottal fry in college aged students.

Poster Sessions

Friday, April 6, 5:30 – 6:30

P 1 - A Phonetic Complexity-Based Approach to Intelligibility and Articulatory Precision Testing

Victoria Moss; Claire Custer, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Mili Kuruvilla-Dugdale, PhD

This poster describes a phonetic complexity-based approach to speech intelligibility and articulatory precision testing using preliminary data from talkers with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to determine the utility of a complexity-based approach to speech testing, implement a weighting-based approach to calculating articulatory precision and evaluate the utility of current dysarthria assessment.

P 2 - CCC-2 Measures at Ages 6 and 8: Children Adopted Internationally

Corinne McGownd, BA, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Deborah Hwa-Froelich, PhD, CCC-SLP

Children adopted internationally experience a disruption in language acquisition. The purpose of this study was to compare parent perceptions of language and social communication skills at six and eight years of age and four to six years after their adoption. Parent report was used to gather information on the children’s language and social communication behaviors. The study included 49 children (25 adopted). Group comparisons and longitudinal development will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe parent-reported language and social communication abilities of children internationally adopted when they are six and eight years old, compare parent-reported language and social communication abilities of children internationally adopted and children who are not adopted when they are six and eight years old and discuss developmental growth patterns on parent-reported measures between ages six and eight between children adopted internationally and children who are not adopted.

P 3 - Adults Who Stutter: Self-Esteem, Coping, Stress Management, Support Groups

Rebecca Cordia, BS, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Nancy Montgomery, PhD, CCC-SLP

Stuttering is a relatively common and well-known communication disorder that impacts the lives of those who stutter. In this study, the researcher examined a population of adults who self-identify as stutterers and the relationships among their self-esteem and the strategies they use to cope with their stuttering, the stress management techniques they use and the support groups they utilize. Participants were located through online stuttering communities via Facebook. This study surveyed 100 participants; 65 males, 33 females, and two who identify as other. A quantitative and qualitative survey was employed for collection of coping strategies, stress management techniques and participation in support groups. Rosenberg’s (1965) self-esteem scale was used as a measure of self-esteem. Overall, the participants scored, on average, in the slightly higher than normal range for self-esteem. Results indicated that higher self-esteem was significantly positively correlated with higher ratings of stress management techniques. Higher self-esteem was also associated with healthier usage of certain coping mechanism techniques. There was no statistically significant difference between self-esteem in the population that was examined and participation in support groups between those who attended no support groups versus those who attend at least one. The participants in this sample were all active in online stuttering communities which could account for higher than expected average self-esteem. Online communication completely removes all effects of stuttering, and for those who stutter, provides a forum to interact with others, essentially freeing stutters from their communication disorder.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify how people who stutter cope with stress related to their stuttering, identify various resources that are available to help individuals who stutter and identify areas of a person who stutters' personal life affected by stuttering and the relation of their listeners and recognize ways technology has changed the everyday activities of people who stutter.

P 4 - The Viscosity of Commercially Available Infant Formula

Alexandria Trentham, BA, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Misty Tilmon, MA, CCC-SLP

The thickness of infant formula can influence an infant with dysphagia resulting from a variety of conditions. The natural thickness of the formula determines how the infant will tolerate that formula, but often professionals recommend a thickening agent without knowledge of the natural thickness of the infant formula. The purpose of this present study is to compare the differences of the natural thickness of commercially-available liquid and powder infant formulas. This will be performed using the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative (IDDSI) flow test. IDDSI is comprised of a multidisciplinary group of professionals seeking to establish standardization of liquid and modified foods for individuals with dysphagia. They have designed standardized testing methods to ensure consistency of liquid and food viscosities. In this study, eight commercially available infant formulas will be tested with three trials per infant formula. The formula will be prepared according to manufacturer’s instructions and will be tested using the IDDSI flow test at three different time increments. The proposed hypothesis is that there will be a difference in the consistency of powder infant formulas versus liquid infant formulas and that their viscosities will change over time. This research will help provide information about the natural thickness of commercially-available infant formulas, which will provide possible alternatives to thickening agents for infants with dysphagia.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define viscosity as it pertains to commercially available infant formulas, identify the changes in the consistencies of the formula over a period of time and describe the procedure to measure the viscosity of infant formula independently using the IDDSI flow test and compare the viscosities of commercially available liquid infant formula to powder infant formula.

P 5 - Mild Cognitive Deficits and Activites of Daily Living in Older Adults

Logann Driskell, BS; Brittani Summers, BS, from Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP

Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), also known as Mild Neurocognitive Disorder, is a stage between cognitive aging and dementia with evidence of memory, language and judgment problems (Mayo Clinic, 2017). MCI affects older adults in their everyday life and can impose many challenges, including their activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). The purpose of this study was to explore the nature of MCI and its impact on ADLs and IADLs in older adults living in the Southeast Missouri region. A database of cognitive, ADL, IADL, nutrition, health literacy, mental status, social support and quality of life scores was created by recruiting 98 community-dwelling adults aged 65 or older. The participants completed a case history followed by a series of surveys and assessments. The assessments were as follows: Information Consent Form, Demographic Information and Case History Form, Rapid Geriatric Assessment, Physical Self-Maintenance Scale, Health Literacy Questionnaire, Pearson Social Support Questionnaire, and WHO-QOL-BREF. Results indicated that there was no significant correlation between the Physical Self-Maintenance Scale, which assessed activities of daily living as well as instrumental activities of daily living, and RCS (Rapid Cognition Score), which assessed cognition of the individuals; however, a significant correlation (p<0.05) was found between WHO-QOL Domain1, which assesses physical abilities and the Physical Self-Maintenance Scale. Gender and age were also taken into consideration when analyzing the data.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify the signs and symptoms of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older adults, describe the effects of MCI on ADLs and IADLs and describe the importance of MCI assessments in older adults.

P 6 - Consequences of Mild Cognitive Impairment on Quality of Life

Kelly Gerrein, BS; Alyssa Miles, BS, from Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP

The consequences of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to aging hinders the everyday life of older adults, thus affecting their quality of life (QoL) (e.g., Teng, Tassniyom, & Lu, 2012). Also, studies have detected that certain aspects of QoL are altered in individuals with MCI (e.g., Muangpaisan, Assantachai, Intalapaporn and Pisansalakij, 2008). The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of cognition on quality of life. A database of cognitive, ADL, IADL, nutrition, health literacy, mental status, social support and quality of life scores was created by recruiting 98 participants, ages 65 years and above. The participants were recruited from community dwellings in the southeast Missouri and Illinois region. They completed a case history form followed by a series of paper-pencil based assessments. The assessments were as follows: Information Consent Form, Demographic Information And Case History Form, Rapid Geriatric Assessment, Physical Self-Maintenance Scale, Health Literacy Questionnaire, Pearson Social Support Questionnaire and WHO-QOL-BREF. Though associations were noted to exist among the scores obtained from the rapid cognition score (RCS), which assessed cognition of the individuals and the four domains (physical, psychological, social, environmental) from the WHO-QOL-BREF, the correlations were not significant at 0.05 level of significance. Healthcare professionals need to be cognizant of the significant reduction in QoL in older adults with MCI, and may recommend assessments and interventions.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify the signs and symptoms of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older adults, list various protocols/measures that can be used to examine quality of life in older adults and describe the influence of MCI on quality of life.

P 7 - Investigation of Assessment for Differential Diagnosis of Reading Disorders

Whitley Bieser, BS; Erin Allen, BS; Tessa Anderson, BS, from Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP

This poster examines the assessment of school-age children with observed reading disorders who have not been identified with a specific diagnosis. The investigators will develop a diagnostic protocol that will identify strengths and weaknesses within the individual which may allow identification of one of the following reading disorders: a generalized spoken and written language disorder, a specific reading comprehension deficit or dyslexia. Determining the diagnosis is essential for determining the best course of intervention and to determine if referral to other professionals for intervention is necessary.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define the three types of reading disorders, identify assessment tools for the differential diagnosis of reading disorders and determine potential intervention strategies for reading disorders.

P 8 - Acoustic Markers of Simulated Increased Vocal Effort During Word Production

Erin Tippit; Alexa Ethridge, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Maria Dietrich, PhD, CCC-SLP

This poster is part of an MRI study to determine the pattern of brain activation underlying increased vocal effort to better understand individual differences in risk for voice disorders. The primary aim was to investigate differences in acoustic markers between easy onset and hard glottal word productions to validate differences in vocal effort. The secondary aim was to determine if the differences in acoustic markers were consistent across the screening, mock scanner and research scanner settings in which these words were produced.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe the relationship between increased vocal effort and voice disorders, describe the difference between easy onset and hard glottal voice productions and name one acoustic measure of vocal effort.

P 9 - Building Vocabulary Skills in School-Age Children Through Morphological Analysis

Sara Steele, PhD, CCC-SLP, St. Louis University

Morphological analysis intervention is an evidence-based strategy that involves teaching prefixes, suffixes and common root words as a means of developing vocabulary. This intervention is most appropriate for upper elementary and middle school students. Following morphological analysis instruction, positive results have been shown for vocabulary, spelling and reading. This poster will include background information on derivational morphology, a summary of external scientific evidence in support of the strategy and ideas for morphological analysis activities.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to discuss the rationale for teaching morphological analysis skills, discuss the benefits and limitations of morphological analysis as a vocabulary building strategy and implement appropriate morphological analysis activities.

P 10 - Communication Disorders in College Program for Students With Special Needs

Jessica Gilmore, BS; Collin Shelton, BS; Alyssa Olson, BS; Naomi Schartz, BS, from University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Anna Campbell, MS, CCC-SLP

This poster will provide background information pertaining to the University of Central Missouri (UCM) Transformation Health Responsibility Independence Vocation and Education (THRIVE) program. Adult clients with special needs and communication disorders were seen individually and in group by UCM communication disorders graduate students. This poster will include explanation and results for individual and group treatment for client goals including problem solving, fluency, functional daily life activities, pragmatics and reading comprehension. These goals were targeted specifically for the adult clients living on a college campus and treatment strategies specifically targetted activities of daily living for college students on campus.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify specific communication needs of adults with special needs on a college campus, identify treatment focus relevant to adults with special needs attending college programs and list future activities of daily living as possible treatment targets including future employment settings and obtaining and maintaining interpersonal relationships.

P 11 - The Effects of Kangaroo Care on Mother-Infant Interaction

Tessa Anderson, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Marcia Haims, PhD, CCC-SLP

Kangaroo care is an alternative method to incubator care that is used as a form of treatment for preterm infants. It is a method of caring for premature babies that involves direct contact when a newborn is placed skin-to-skin on his or her mother’s bare chest. The physiological benefits of kangaroo care have been well-documented; however, empirical data regarding the effects of skin-to-skin contact on mother-infant interaction is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of kangaroo care on mother-infant interaction. The participants for the current study consisted of low birthweight, preterm infants that weighed less than 2500 grams and a gestation period of less than 37 weeks. Mother-infant interaction was videotaped at the NICU follow-up clinic at Saint Francis Medical Center. While observing the video-taped mother-infant interactions, the observation-only items from the Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale were used to identify the communicative capabilities of each infant. The mother/infant communication screening was also utilized to identify current mother-infant interaction. The effects kangaroo care had on mother-infant interaction at six-, twelve- and eighteen-months adjusted age will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe the procedure of performing kangaroo care, identify barriers to performing kangaroo care and explain how engaging in kangaroo care affects mother-infant interaction.

P 12 - Undergraduate Students' Ability to Perceive and Produce /ɔ/ and /a/: An Examination of Vowel Merger

Pia Isabela Burgos; Allison Zink; Morgan Abegg, from Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Shatonda Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP

Research has shown that in various locations in the United States, there has been a merger of the /ɔ/ and /a/ vowels for speakers of American English. This phenomenon, known as low back vowel merger, has been specifically studied by Majors (2005) in the state of Missouri. Majors (2005) concluded that for speakers in Missouri, outside of Saint Louis, there is indeed a minimal discrimination or detection in the differences between these two vowels, yet in Saint Louis these two vowels are still produced differently. The topic of low back vowel merger is of interest to communication sciences and disorders (CSD) faculty and students in that nearly all CSD students are required to take a phonetics course during their undergraduate and/or graduate studies. Currently, phonetics texts continue to make a distinction between the /ɔ/ and /a/, yet faculty instructing these courses may have difficulty getting their students to perceive the difference. This study is part of a lager study that examines auditory discrimination and verbal production of the /ɔ/ and the /a/ vowels by a wide variety of speakers across age, gender, education level and state/region of origin. The purpose of this current study is to analyze a subset of the data, specifically focusing on undergraduate students’ auditory perceptions and verbal productions of the /ɔ/ and /a/. This analysis will compare undergraduate students at our university based on age, grade level and major.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to discuss the difference in perception between the /c/ and /a/ vowels among undergraduate students, discuss the differences in production between /c/ and /a/ vowels among undergraduate students and discuss how speech differences may influence CSD students’ performance in phonetics classes.

P 13 - Changes in Pragmatics and Related Vocabulary After Cochlear Implantation

Rachel Glade, PhD, CCC-SLP; Mackenzie Gross, From University of Arkansas

This poster will track the linguistic and pragmatic development of a toddler with cochlear implants. The participant in the study received a left cochlear implant at 15 months and a right cochlear implant at 20 months of age. The participant failed her newborn screening test at birth, thus declared deaf. This study is necessary as there is limited research on what linguistic and pragmatic development takes place over time in toddlers with cochlear implants.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify and differentiate between the three types of hearing loss and several hearing technologies, recall appropriate audiological management and early communication interaction and track the linguistic and pragmatic development that takes place in a toddler with cochlear implants.

P 14 - Comparing iPad-Based and Traditional Audiometer-Based Hearing Screenings

Karissa Vernon, BS; Lindsey Phillips, BS, from Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Susan Fulton, PhD, CCC-A

Pure-tone hearing screenings are commonly used in school settings in order to assess hearing loss in children. Attention, time to complete testing and examiner factors may influence the validity and reliability of test results. As technology advances, computer, mobile and tablet- based screening applications are becoming useful tools for diagnostics (Rourke, Kong, & Bromwich, 2016; Swanepoel, Myburgh, Howe, Mahomed and Eikelboom, 2014). Tablet -based products allow for affordable and accessible methods of screening children in school settings (McPherson, Law, & Wong, 2010). Interactive, accurate and efficient testing tools are needed to engage children during hearing screenings. This study will utilize Sound Scouts™, a new iPad application, that screens tones-in-noise, speech-in-quiet and speech-in-noise hearing via an interactive story format (Dillon, Mee, Moreno and Seymour, submitted). The app is currently normed on children in Australia, but not in the United States. The purpose of this study is to compare standard audiometer-based hearing screening results with those obtained via Sound Scouts™. Forty children, aged 5-10 years of age, will be recruited from private elementary schools in the Cape Girardeau, Missouri area. Standard audiometer-elicited pure tone and speech-in-noise screening results and those obtained with Sound Scouts will be compared. Surveys will be used to compare the efficiency between the two methods. We predict that the results from the iPad based audiometer software, Sound Scouts, will have a significant relationship with the standard pure tone audiometer screening results.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe how a computer or iPad based screening operates, discuss the benefits of using iPad based screenings and compare and contrast standard pure-tone hearing screening measures and iPad based screening measures.

P 15 - Conversational Vocabulary in Preschool-Age Children Who Stutter: Application of MATTR

Casey Clogston, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Stacy Wagovich, PhD, CCC-SLP

Word knowledge and vocabulary diversity is an important aspect of the developmental process. Children’s vocabulary knowledge, as displayed on vocabulary tests and in their spontaneous language, increases with age over the preschool years. For children who stutter (CWS), although we know that their word knowledge increases, evidenced by formal vocabulary tests, it is unclear whether they show closely corresponding growth in vocabulary diversity of conversational language. This preliminary study was designed to examine how preschool-age CWS and children who do not stutter (CWNS) compare in the correspondence between age, vocabulary test performance and conversational lexical diversity. CWS and CWNS, matched on age, gender and SES, and receptive vocabulary participated in a larger study related to language and cognition in CWS (see Anderson & Wagovich, 2017). For the present study, the play-based conversational language samples of equal groups of three-five year old CWS and CWNS were analyzed for lexical diversity using MATTR in CLAN (MacWhinney, 2000). For each group, correspondences between age, vocabulary scores and conversational lexical diversity were estimated, and the groups were compared in the strength of correspondence between variables. Results will be interpreted in terms of factors that explain why CWS may not show the same correspondence between formal scores of vocabulary knowledge and the diversity of vocabulary they demonstrate in conversation. Clinical implications will be highlighted.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to contrast information provided by vocabulary tests in relation to that provided by lexical diversity analysis in spontaneous language, describe a relatively new analysis of lexical diversity appropriate for use with spontaneous language samples and discuss several factors that may contribute to a child’s lexical diversity scores.

P 16 - Development of an ICF Core Set for Motor Speech Disorders

Michelle Payne, MA, CCC-SLP; Hisako Matsuo, PhD; Faith Stagge, BA; Travis Threats, PhD, CCC-SLP; from Saint Louis University

Acquired motor speech disorders can lead to loss of intelligibility, or acceptability, of communication. This can cause restrictions to an individual’s participation in personally relevant life activities, which may facilitate a decrease in quality of life and “change in identify and self-esteem” (Lowit, Miller, & Kuschmann, 2014, p. 51). The international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) is a holistic framework which can help facilitate rehabilitation plans and goals. Though comprehensive, containing over 1,400 codes, the full ICF framework could be deemed difficult to apply (Bickenbach, Cieza, Rauch, Stucki, 2012). The WHO and the ICF Research Branch started the core set initiative in 2001 to investigate code relevance to specific health-related circumstances or contexts. This process is a research based muli-step methodology that considers various perspectives to create valid core sets. In this study, a web-based survey on the qualtrics platform was utilized to look specifically at the speech-language pathologist’s perspective on which codes are most relevant when working with an individual with acquired motor speech disorders. In addition, ethnographic interviews may confirm findings from the survey and provide more in-depth analysis of idiosyncrasies. A set of most relevant codes has been analyzed, and this research will serve as one of the studies needed for the creation of a comprehensive core set for acquired motor speech disorders. The core set creation allows for a more holistic outlook on an individual’s life, and it also serves as a starting place for future evaluation and outcome tools to be created.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe methods of dysphagia intervention using the IOPI, demonstrate an understanding of the components of ICF, demonstrate the need for an ICF core set for acquired motor speech disorders and demonstrate an understanding of the ICF areas and codes most pertinent to acquired motor speech disorders in order to better plan intervention.

P 17 - Do Lingual Strength Exercises Reduce Premature Spillage?

Catherine Bean, MHS, CCC-SLP; Ashley Oneal, MS, CCC-SLP, from Rusk Rehabilitation Center

The Iowa oral performance instrument (IOPI) objectively measures tongue strength and endurance, and lip strength and endurance. Clinically, the IOPI is frequently used to treat dysphagia. The data presented will look at a designed exercise protocol utilizing the IOPI and its relation to clinical outcomes in stroke and brain injury populations. The objective of the case studies presented is to assess whether the use of progressive lingual strength exercises lead to reduction of premature spillage of boluses and advancement of patient liquid levels.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe methods of dysphagia intervention using the IOPI, identify four anatomical points of premature spillage during the swallow, differentiate between swallow function observed before and after the use of lingual strengthening exercises and perform lingual strengthening exercises using the IOPI following demonstration with the product.

P 18 - Engagement During Story-Generating Activities With People With Dementia

Bailey Hoffman, BS, Missouri State University
Supervisor: Alana Mantie-Kozlowski, PhD, CCC-SLP

Five people with dementia (PWD) along with two trained facilitators participated in a group story-generating activities across five posters. Drawing inspiration from TimeSlips, the story-telling program encouraged PWD to creatively participate in group story generating activities. Differing stimuli were provided to encourage engagement from the PWD. Findings showcase the results of verbal and non-verbal forms of engagement, and are triangulated with the use of participant interviews and field notes.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to explain various forms of engagement that can be measured when working with people with dementia, identify types of stimuli that may be facilitative when working with people with dementia and describe the purpose of group story-generating as it relates to social engagement of people with dementia.

P 19 - Expressive Writing for Aphasia: How Writing Can Improve Spoken Language

Kelli Showers, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Amanda Eaton, PhD, CCC-SLP

Expressive writing is personal and emotional writing without regard to form or other writing conventions like spelling, punctuation and verb agreement (Pennebaker, 2004), also called therapy writing. It has been used as a therapeutic outlet for several decades. It has been used in psychological practice with patients who have or are currently experiencing an illness, depression or grief. In the field of speech-language pathology, it is common practice to use expressive writing to target reading and language development in school age children. However, there is limited research investigating the utility of expressive writing as a treatment approach to target spoken language in persons with aphasia (PWA). This poster will review the current literature on expressive writing, identify benefits of expressive writing within diverse clinical populations and discuss implications for PWA. Additionally, models for incorporating expressive writing into traditional aphasia therapy will be discussed. Further research might provide evidence and rationale for new treatment approaches incorporating therapy writing to improve expressive language for PWA.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify the benefits of expressive writing across different clinical populations, recall the models used for incorporating expressive writing into traditional aphasia therapy and describe the call for action to begin further research in the area of using expressive writing as a treatment approach for persons with aphasia.

P 20 - Outcomes of Service Learning for Students within CSD Programs

Taylor Sjogren, BS, Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP

Service learning provides students the opportunity to apply course constructs to community-based placements. Surprisingly, limited research exists to investigate how service-learning projects can support the development of future speech-language pathologists. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the outcomes of service learning for students within communication disorders (CSD) programs. This was accomplished by reviewing multiple databases to identify the best available evidence on this topic. Results indicate that service learning has positive outcomes for students within CSD programs. Further implications will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define service learning, identify components of service learning that support student development and identify directions for future research regarding service learning within CSD programs.

P 21 - Family Perceptions/Challenges in Raising Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Kaitlin Bacon, BA; Anna Kramer, BA, from Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP

Families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) experience stress from a variety of factors. One well documented challenge reported in the research has been the impact of the diagnosis on parent and sibling relationships. The purpose of this systematic review was to use the best available evidence to broadly exvvamine perceptions of family members related to the challenges and the joys of living with an individual with ASD. This was accomplished by searching multiple data bases to identify scholarly articles followed by quality appraisal of the evidence. Once the best available evidence was identified, trends and themes across the reported perceptions were identified. Clinical implications for speech-language pathologists will be reported.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define autism spectrum disorder, identify the different challenges experienced by siblings and parents and analyze the family dynamic when raising a child with ASD.

Poster Sessions

Saturday, April 7, 7:00 – 8:00

P 22 - Deaf With Disabilities: Whose Students are They?

Jessica Moore, BA; Nikki Arand, BS, from Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Susan Lenihan, PhD, CED

Students who are deaf or hard of hearing with a disability (DWD) are likely to appear on the caseload of many speech-language pathologists (SLPs), itinerant teachers of the deaf, special educators and general education teachers. While SLPs and many other professionals do not have explicit training with this population, we do have the tools and knowledge to provide these students with the skills they need to succeed. The focus of this poster is on instructional practices for students who are DWD, in addition to collaboration between professionals. Due to overlapping characteristics of the deaf and hard of hearing population and other disabilities, research on differential diagnosis will be reviewed. Long-term outcomes and transition planning will be examined to determine the appropriate plan of action for these students.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to list three instructional strategies to use with students who are DWD, describe three key features that warrant further assessment in students who are deaf or hard of hearing and identify four successful components of collaboration.

P 23 - Food Selectivity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Whitley Bieser, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Marcia Haims, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between food selectivity and sensory perception issues in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The present study is a non-experimental and correlational design as it studies the relationship between the presence of food selectivity and sensory processing difficulties. Food selectivity is measured by the individual’s refusal of foods and/or their high-frequency consumption of single foods. Sensory processing difficulties are measured through the individual’s social participations, vision, hearing touch, body awareness, balance and motion, planning and ideas, and total sensory systems (Parham & Ecker, 2007). The participants will be parents of children ages 3-10 with ASD. They will attend one session with the examiner to complete a packet of questionnaires and standardized measures addressing their child’s severity of ASD, average food intake, and sensory processing information. The proposed hypothesis is that individuals with ASD who demonstrate sensory processing difficulties will demonstrate the characteristic of food selectivity. This will allow for more individual consideration of therapy techniques when addressing feeding issues in the ASD population.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define food selectivity as it pertains to children with Autism Spectrum Disorders, explain potential factors that contribute to food selectivity in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and identify if a correlation between Autism Spectrum Disorders and Sensory Processing difficulties exists.

P 24 - Experiences of Using AAC Devices of College Age CSD Students

Emily Bland, BS; Lauren Miller, BS; Annika Svoboda, BS, from Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP

In this study, communication science disorders (CSD) undergraduate students explored using augmentative alternative communication (AAC) devices in everyday scenarios in order to better understand personal challenges and perceptions of others when using an AAC device. Four undergraduate CSD students used AAC devices to communicate in various educational, public and work settings. Results indicated a number of personal challenges including isolation, shyness and frustration. Additionally, there were many instances of confusion for those in the environment around the user of the device. Implications for clinical practice will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define AAC, describe common challenges of using AAC devices and describe implications for clinical practice.

P 25 - Analyzing Feeding Solutions for Dysphagia in the Dementia Population

Susan James, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Gale Rice, PhD, CCC-SLP

Dementia is often associated with dysphagia, especially as the disease progresses into its advanced stages. Dysphagia characteristics associated with advanced dementia include the inability to acknowledge food, having impaired swallow reflexes, difficulty managing secretions and prandial aspiration. When assessing the presence and level of dysphagia in this population, it is important for the speech-language pathologist to understand the risk factors involved with feeding options, especially artificial feeding. It is a common misconception that tube feeding is the safest option for older adults with advanced dementia. However, nasogastric (NG) and percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG) tubes have no evident benefits to survival when compared to hand feeding, and studies have shown that artificial feeding does not reduce the risk of malnutrition and aspiration pneumonia. In addition, complications can arise that are secondary to tube insertion, causing more issues aside from nutritional intake. Advanced dementia is part of the end-of-life process, which needs to be considered when choosing the best feeding option for the patient.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify characteristics of dysphagia in the dementia population, differentiate between the benefits and downsides to feeding tubes in the dementia population and recall non-tube feeding strategies for the dementia population.

P 26 - Comps Alternative: Graduate Students’ Reflections on Peer Presentations

Andrea Newburry; Sara Lambeth, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP

At Truman State University, clinical process commentary presentations (CPCs) are a method of self-reflection in graduate student education. Student presenters evaluate their clinical skills to show clinicians’ growth in place of comprehensive exams. Presentations are given by graduate student clinicians and observed by peers of differing cohorts. For many semesters, these peers have observed the CPCs of the presenters and rated their presentations based on how it related to their personal clinical experiences. The different cohorts were retrospectively broken into three groups: pre-CPC, CPC and post-CPC. The pre-CPC group consisted of those who had not yet reached the point of the CPC presentation, the CPC group was made up of those who were in the same cohort as those who were currently presenting their CPC and the post-CPC group was those who were in the two semesters between their first CPC and second CPC. Peer observers rated the presentations given by the participants in the CPC group on a peer response form using a Likert scale from one to five (one=strongly disagree and five=strongly agree), as well as two short answer questions.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe the CPC process that takes place at Truman State University, articulate the perceptions of clinical skills by different groups of graduate students with varying levels of experience and identify the growth of students in pre-CPC, CPC and post-CPC and their education levels based on their reflections.

P 27 - Tough to Swallow: A Review of Research on BSE Components

Kelly Brooks, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Carmen Russell, PhD, CCC-SLP

There is a current challenge for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working with those in need of beside swallow evaluations to remain up-to-date on research developments regarding valid and invalid components of bedside evaluations for dysphagia. This review of current peer-reviewed literature will provide a report of the sensitivity and specificity of a variety of standard and alternative bedside swallow examination components. Evidence of valid and invalid maneuvers will be presented, and alternative and additional bedside assessment techniques will be offered.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify common components of bedside screening evaluations, list screening procedures currently supported by research and procedures shown to be invalid and explain which procedures still require further research.

P 28 - The Effectiveness of Mindfulness for Treating Fluency Disorders

Valerie Moyers, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Lynne Shields, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F

Fluency disorders can be treated using a number of different methods. While learning how to manage disfluencies is an important aspect of treatment, mindfulness is an additional method to promote the development of healthy attitudes and emotions around stuttering. Mindfulness can be practiced through yoga, breath and meditation. This poster will focus on research related to the use of mindfulness in treating fluency disorders.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify how breath can be used to increase fluency, describe how mindfulness may contribute to decreased anxiety associated with stuttering and define mindfulness as it relates to stuttering.

P 29 - Mild Cognitive Impairment and Social Support Perceptions in Older Adults

Elizabeth Wesa, BS; Shelby Kate McCord, BS, from Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP

Cognitive decline in older adults due to aging, often leads to disruption in social functions in their everyday life such as social interactions, perceptions of social support and quality of life (Kotwal, Kim, Waite, and Dale, 2016). The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of cognitive aging on older adults’ perceptions of social support, mental status and social interactions. Ninety-eight community dwelling adults at the age of 65 or older, completed a series of surveys and assessments that gathered information about cognitive level, quality of life, social and mental status, health literacy and nutrition, and ADLs and IADLs. The assessments were as follows: information consent form, demographic information and case history form, rapid geriatric assessment, physical self-maintenance scale, health literacy questionnaire, pearson social support questionnaire and WHO-QOL-Bref. Results indicated that there was a significant correlation between the rapid cognitive score (RCS) and social support question number (SSQN) score. No significant correlation was noted between RCS and SSQ satisfaction score (SSQS). Also, no significant correlation was found between geriatric depression scale (GDS) and SSQS. Gender, age and education were also analyzed for additional information. Healthcare professionals should be able to notice changes in social functioning in older adults to provide screening for cognitive loss.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe how cognitive status in older adults affects their perceptions of social support, describe how cognitive status in order adults affects their mental status and describe how cognitive status in older adults affects their satisfaction with social interactions.

P 30 - Behavioral Versus Naturalistic Approaches for Language Learning

Kelsey Heisserer, BA, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Laura O'Hara, PhD, CCC-SLP

This poster aims to provide a literature review to weigh the strengths and weaknesses of using a behavioral versus naturalistic approach to early childhood language intervention. Aspects of various direct and naturalistic service delivery models will be described to provide learners with a comprehensive idea of each strategy’s overall effectiveness. Additionally, the poster presentation will explore the effectiveness of behavioral and child-directed intervention approaches in regard to different early childhood populations, such as autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disabilities.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to differentiate between behavioral and naturalistic service delivery models for early childhood language learning, identify appropriate models of intervention across language skill levels and special populations for language learning and determine the overall effectiveness of behavioral and naturalistic intervention approaches for language learning in early childhood.

P 31 - Dysphasia Management for the School-Based Speech-Language Pathologist

Martha Guariglia, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Laura O'Hara, PhD, CCC-SLP

This poster will provide an overview of the current data on children who require swallowing therapy in the school setting. Current American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) standards on scope of practice will be reviewed. The current level of confidence school-based speech-language pathologists (SLP) have with treating children with dysphagia will be discussed. New methods of acquiring competencies and meeting feeding and swallowing needs in the school will be addressed.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to explain the need for dysphagia treatment in the school setting and current level of SLP confidence, describe methods of evidence-based treatment for dysphagia in a school setting and explain the approaches of acquiring competency in the school setting.

P 32 - Assessing and Treating English Language Learners with Suspected Language Delays

Theresa Visintine, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Barbara Meyer, MA, CCC-SLP

Research findings report a large amount of English language learners (ELL) being over represented in special education populations, when in fact they do not qualify for a disorder and are considered to only have a language difference. It is important for speech-language pathologists (SLP) to utilize a thorough assessment of each child’s skills prior to qualifying them for special education services. Additionally, it is essential to choose intervention strategies that will be beneficial to those students who may be ELL with a language disorder. This poster will provide an overview of various assessment tools used by SLPs to evaluate children who are ELL and the most efficient way to differentiate between children who present with a language disorder and those who have a language difference. It will also review effective intervention strategies to use with ELL students who have a language disorder in therapy.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to discuss the impact of bilingual environments on children with suspected language disorders, describe a thorough evaluation process of ELL students with suspected language disorders and explain intervention strategies to utilize with ELL students who are diagnosed with a language disorder.

P 33 - Language Intervention for Children Who Have Been Mistreated

Rachel Allison, BS, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Barbara Meyer, MA, CCC-SLP

A population that needs special consideration from speech-language pathologists (SLP) are children who have been mistreated. Since there is a relationship between mistreatment and language deficits, it is likely that a pediatric SLP will work with a child who has been mistreated. Past research indicates that children who have been mistreated tend to show deficits in receptive vocabulary, receptive language and expressive language. Language deficits in this population are similar to language deficits in other populations. Therefore, treatment methods that specifically address the area of deficit are appropriate when working with mistreated children. However, specific factors, such as home life and access to resources, need to be considered when planning treatment for these children. As SLPs and other health/education professionals are mandated reporters of child abuse, it is important for professionals working with children to be able to identify signs of mistreatment in children we work with. The focus of this poster is on possible treatment methods for increasing language abilities in children who have been mistreated. Factors of consideration when working with this population will also be discussed along with ways of identifying children who may have been mistreated.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe factors to consider when working with children who have been mistreated, explain possible treatment methods for increasing language skills in children who have been mistreated and discuss ways of identifying mistreatment in children.

P 34 - Effects of Post Stroke Aphasia on Communication and Social Participation in Adults Age 18-65

Elizabeth Racich, BA; Sarah Heiman, BS; Katie Harris, BS, from Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Shatonda Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this poster is to identify and annotate the main effects that aphasia, as a result of stroke, have on young adults age 18-65. This review offers secondary areas of rehabilitation needs for those that suffer from post stroke aphasia.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify the main effects that aphasia has on the young adult population age 18-65, discuss reasons why individuals with aphasia have decreased participation in social settings, discuss possible factors influencing return to work in young adults with aphasia and discuss factors pertaining to mental health as it relates to young adults with post stroke aphasia.

P 35 - The Effect of Psychosocial Difficulties on Adolescents With TBI: A Systematic Review

Blair Palma, BS; Gabriella Perlongo, BS, from Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Shatonda Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this systematic review is to examine adolescents’ quality of life after sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Particular attention will be given to the influences of psychosocial disturbances, resulting in TBI on quality of life. A comprehensive search of various electronic databases was conducted to identify research studies that fit the specified inclusion criteria for this review. The quality of all relevant studies was appraised using a rating scale of one to three, with one being the lowest of quality and three being the highest. The review identified eight studies that pertained to the research question. Among these studies were two qualitative research designs, five quantitative research designs and one cohort-prospective design. All studies used in this systematic review referenced psychosocial disturbances following adolescent TBI and how these disturbances produced negative outcomes for adolescents with TBI. The review reveals that psychosocial difficulties produce negative outcomes which result in an overall decreased quality of life for an adolescent with TBI.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to discuss how psychosocial outcomes post TBI can affect an adolescents' quality of life, identify how psychosocial outcomes post TBI can affect an adolescents mental health and discuss how psychosocial outcomes post TBI can affect an adolescents ability to integrate back into society.

P 36 - Eating Feeding and Swallowing Assessment in Individuals With Down Syndrome

Julia Tedrow, BS; Kayleen Turnis, BA, from Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Shatonda Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP

A comprehensive search of electronic databases included The American Journal of Occupational Therapy (AJOT), Pub Med, Google Scholar and Academic Search Complete. Sixteen articles were found that were directly related to the question. Nine were identified as the best evidence available. Results indicated that a variety of assessment types were used to determine possible treatment approaches. Types of assessments included interview, questionnaire, diagnostic evaluations (VFSS), observations (video-tape and direct), oral-motor (skills, questionnaire, assessment) and oral sensory processing. Overall findings suggest that there is inconsistency regarding the ways feeding, eating and swallowing are assessed in individuals with DS and that parental report plays an important role in the assessment process.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify key components for assessing feeding, eating and swallowing in individuals with DS, differentiate between the effectiveness of multiple assessment tools and discuss the importance of a team based assessment approach.

P 37 - Disparities in Treatment and Outcomes Post TBI Across Race/Income

Lauren Johnson, BS, Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Shatonda Jones, PhD, CCC-SLP

Disparities in medical treatment and access to medical care are ongoing issues for minorities or people living below the poverty line in the United States. Research has been found for racial disparities in treatment in many health topics, such as cardiology and primary care, but less research has focused on disparities of treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) with even less being completed to compare income or insurance and race in this treatment. TBI is a leading cause of disability in the United States and people of a minority race are more likely to be admitted to a hospital for a TBI as well as being more likely to live below the poverty line when compared to non-Hispanic whites. Because of these concerns, a systematic review was completed to analyze past findings on these issues in order to determine if disparities exist in treatment and functional outcome for minority populations, such as people of color and/or those living below the poverty line, and what disparities, if any, may apply to rehabilitation facilities and rehabilitation therapies.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify disparities in treatment in adults post TBI across race and insurance level, identify disparities in functional outcomes in adults post TBI across race and insurance level and identify clinical implications of disparities in treatment and outcomes post TBI.

P 38 - Life Participation Approach to Aphasia and Communication Disorders Students: A Study

Erin Allen, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Martha Cook, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this study was to pilot a life participation approach to aphasia (LPAA) program at Southeast Missouri State University. The LPAA program supports individuals with aphasia and allows them the opportunity to choose activities in which they wish to participate which allows them to re-engage in their communities following a cerebrovascular accident (CVA). For the purpose of this study, three student volunteers were assigned to an adult individual with aphasia. Two of the three student volunteers and the adult with aphasia were required to meet at least twice a month during the fall 2017 and spring 2018 semester while engaging in social and community events. Researchers gathered data regarding whether the adult participant’s quality of life increased as a result of participation in the program based on results from the stroke and aphasia quality of life scale-39 administered at the beginning of the semester and at the end of the semester. Perspectives of the students regarding their understanding of aphasia and ability to communicate with an adult diagnosed with aphasia were also measured with pre-and post-tests at the beginning and end of the semester.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe at least three of the five values of the LPAA, discuss how aphasia affects communication and life participation and differentiate between clinician-based and client-based approaches to aphasia.

P 39 - Effect of Voice Quality on Perceptions of Male Athleticism

Leah Bell; Sienna Pace, BA, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Illene Elmlinger, AuD

Voice quality plays a large role in first impressions. This poster analyzes whether or not an individual can determine what sport an individual plays based on the sound of their voice. Speech samples were collected and anonymously presented to unfamiliar listeners. The listeners were then asked to determine which varsity sport, if any, the individual plays. This research project aims to answer the essential question: will an individual with a lower fundamental frequency be perceived to play a seemingly more masculine sport (i.e.football).

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to list common conclusions drawn from the sound of one's voice, recall the definition of fundamental frequency and identify the perception of athleticism based on voice.

P 40 - Instruction for Communication Partners of AAC Users: Why and How?

Kelly Melton, BA, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Gale Rice, PhD, CCC-SLP

Augmentative Alternative Communication (AAC) is currently more prevalent among individuals with complex communication needs than ever before. As clinicians, we focus on teaching our clients how to use their AAC devices for their communication needs, but not necessarily their communication partners. This poster focuses on AAC instruction for communication partners of AAC users. The various populations of AAC users will be reviewed, one model of instruction from the literature will be presented and the barriers to and benefits of instruction for communication partners and AAC users will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to list and describe populations with complex communication needs who use AAC, identify the stages in a proposed instruction model for communication partners and describe the barriers to and benefits of partner instruction for AAC users and their communication partners.

P 41 - Clients’ Experiences With Bell’s Palsy and Facial Retraining Therapy

Micaelyn Montgomery, BS
Supervisor: Michael Perez, MS, CCC-SLP

Facial paralysis is a common problem associated with Bell’s palsy, a disorder caused by viral damage to the VII cranial (facial) nerve. Resulting deficits can impair facial movement, facial expression, appearance, chewing/swallowing and speaking, all of which can lead to psychosocial consequences such as decreases in clients’ self-esteem, interpersonal communications and social functioning. The objectives of this project were to identify client-reported quality of life indicators that pose challenges to Bell’s palsy clients and outcomes that, following non-surgical facial retraining interventions, were recognized as success. Moreover, these outcomes provide speech-language pathologists with a deeper understanding of significant perspectives of Bell’s palsy clients and promote more effective treatment for that same group.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define facial paralysis and the theoretical benefits to the client and the speech-language pathologist, discuss quality of life indicators that pose challenges to Bell’s palsy clients and discuss outcomes that, as a result of non-surgical facial retraining interventions, are recognized as success.

P 42 - Interprofessional Education: Preparing Students With Skills for Interprofessional Practice

Laura O’Hara, PhD, CCC-SLP, Fontbonne University

This poster will focus on the role of interprofessional education and provide an example of how one Missouri speech-language pathology program is preparing students with the knowledge, attitudes and skills for interprofessional practice. It will discuss the role of interprofessional collaborative practice in improving the delivery of speech-language services, as well as identify possible learning experiences for preparing students for interprofessional collaborative practice. In addition, the presenter will discuss opportunities interprofessional education provides and describe possible means of overcoming challenges for implementing interprofessional education.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to discuss the role of interprofessional collaborative practice in improving the delivery of speech-language services, identify possible learning experiences for preparing speech-language pathology students for interprofessional collaborative practice and discuss opportunities interprofessional education provides.

P 43 - Young Women’s Fundamental Frequency: A Longitudinal Study

Erin Tippit; Allison Jarombek, from University of Missouri
Supervisor: Dana Fritz, PhD, CCC-SLP

For the past five years, women aged 20-21 were asked to determine their fundamental frequency using the freeware speech analysis program PRAAT. They were also asked to find their vocal range using this software as well as a virtual piano or standard piano keyboard. This data was analyzed for apparent changes in fundamental frequency over time. As has been reported by Decoster and Debruyne (2000) and Russell, Penny and Pemberton (1995) regarding changes in female fundamental frequency, this data supported the idea that fundamental frequency has decreased in recent history. Median frequency decreased from 294 Hz to 220 Hz with piano keyboard correlates of D4 (above C4/middle C) to A3. Further analysis of changes in vocal range over time will also be included in this study, as well as analysis of additional physical changes in women that may influence fundamental frequency.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to differentiate between fundamental frequency and vocal range, identify decreases in fundamental frequency over time and distinguish between factors influencing changes in fundamental frequency and compare Hz values with their piano keyboard correlates.

P 44 - Therapy Strategies for Speech Disorders Associated with Cleft Palate

Laura Reans, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Ann Bedwinek, MA, CCC-SLP

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Special Interest Group 5, speech science and orofacial disorders, continuing education dommittee offers this poster as a practical guide for therapeutic management of school-aged children with speech disorders associated with cleft palate and/or velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD). Appropriate referral to a craniofacial team and evidence-based treatment techniques will be emphasized.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe the obligatory speech features of VPD and differentiate these from compensatory articulation errors associated with VPD to determine an appropriate referral to a craniofacial team, describe three types of speech treatment strategies to address compensatory articulation errors in children with repaired cleft palate or VPD and describe three solutions to increase effectiveness of treatment and increase generalization of learned skills across environments.

P 45 - Early Diagnosis of ASD: Filling the Gaps in Caregiver First-Concerns

Megann Whitaker, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Ashleigh Boyd, MHS, CCC-SLP

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a multi-faceted neurodevelopment disorder that is characterized by deficits in social communication and the presence of restricted and repetitive behaviors (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Widespread research within the field of developmental disorders has revealed a set of core symptoms related to ASD. More recent research has indicated that early warning signs of ASD are present in young children as early as their first two years of life (Bolton, Golding, Emond and Steer, 2012). Caregivers most frequently report impairments in their child’s socio-emotional or language development as their earliest concern. Behavioral concerns not specific to autism, such as hyperactivity or excessive crying, are also frequently reported. However, behaviors specific to autism such as need for routine and restricted interests are less frequently identified as areas of concern (Guinchat, Chamak, Bonniau, Bodeau, Perisse, Cohen and Danion, 2011). The purpose of this literature review is three-fold: to identify which of the early warning signs of autism are less frequently identified by caregivers, provide resources and strategies that can be provided by early interventionists to enhance caregiver acuity in detecting autism-related deficits in their young children and to identify early intervention programs that can be used to help parents address the early social-communication deficits present in toddlers with autism spectrum disorder.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to recall early warning signs of ASD, identify early warning signs of ASD that are less frequently identified by caregivers, list resources and strategies that can be used to improve caregivers’ recognition of early warning signs of ASD and to list effective treatment programs that can be implemented by early interventionists to target social-communication deficits in young children with ASD.

P 46 - Flexible Endoscopy: Using a Stand to Improve Stability and Reduce Fatigue

Bret Stuckenschneider, BS, Missouri State University
Supervisor: Klaas Bakker, PhD

Flexible endoscopy is a technique that can be used to examine the structures of the nasopharynx, oropharynx, hypopharynx and larynx through a process or gently passing a camera through the nasal cavity down the back of the throat by a certified speech-language pathologist or ear, nose and throat doctor. This procedure can be used to gather a variety of information regarding a patient’s swallow or different abnormalities within the nasal and laryngeal cavities that can affect speech production. Current techniques involve free-handing the endoscope by certified personnel with the patient either sitting directly in front of them or sitting up in a hospital bed in a comfortable, relaxed position. This process can last anywhere from one-five minutes depending on the functions being observed, requiring the clinician to keep their hands raised in an upright, uncomfortable position for prolonged periods of time. This article aims to improve techniques used during procedures involving flexible endoscopy in order to reduce clinician fatigue, improve stability and image quality, and increase comfort for the patient.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify theoretical methods for increasing clinician independence and comfort while performing a fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES), recall the strengths and weaknesses of using a stable base to aid in endoscopic procedures and distinguish between varying methods of administering transnasal endoscopy.

Poster Sessions

Sunday, April 8, 7:15 – 8:15

P 47 – Barriers to Successful AAC for Children with ASD

JaimeDickhaut, BA, Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP

The challenges of implementing AAC strategies with children who exhibit Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have received scattered research attention over the years. Findings have indicated that problems with skills such as imitation, joint attention, and difficulties with information processing contribute to these challenges. The purpose of the current systematic review was to use a framework developed by Beukelman and Mirenda (2013), The Participation Framework, to identify factors in the environment and those specific to the individual that may impede progress in the use of AAC. Clinical implications of this review included a need for professional and paraprofessional education and training in AAC, continued inclusion of students with ASD in regular education settings, and a child’s preference for a functional AAC system should be taken into consideration for optimal outcomes.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define AAC, identify potential barriers to successful AAC use and explain the impact these barriers have on children with ASD.

P 48 - Language Intervention Prior to Cochlear Implantation

Lynn Cook, BS, Julia Virtue, BA, from Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Meredith Harold, PhD, CCC-SLP

Misconceptions have been perpetuated from the long-standing belief that visual language interferes with later spoken language outcomes despite a lack of empirical evidence to support such claims (Henner et al., 2016; Lyness et al., 2013). Recently, research has shed light on the benefits of sign language for ameliorating the effects of early language deprivation in children born deaf (Davidson et al., 2013). Here, we explore the current literature’s findings and recommendations regarding the implementation of sign language prior to cochlear implementation when the desired outcome is spoken language acquisition post-cochlear implantation. Current evidence supports that sign language is not harmful to later spoken language acquisition, but instead is vital for securing a solid linguistic foundation (Amraei et al., Hall, 2017; Hassanzadeh, 2012; Humphries et al., 2012, 2014, 2015, 2017; Lyness et al., 2013; Mellon et al., 2015).

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to be interpret evidence on oral language acquisition following visual language acquisition, identify resources for educating parents on implementing language support and/or intervention while their child awaits a cochlear implant and identify five main findings for clinical implications in support of early acquisition of sign-language for infants born deaf.

P 49 - Life After Laryngectomy: The Female's Perspective

Rebecca Koerner, BA, St. Louis University
Supervisor: Michelle Payne, MA, CCC-SLP

The current study explores the unique perspective of female patients who have undergone a total laryngectomy. Total laryngectomy, a surgery in which the entire larynx is removed for laryngeal cancer, creates a drastic change in the life of a patient. Following surgery, patients often experience functional and psychological changes. The literature pertaining to experience of laryngectomees reflects largely the male perspective. While some studies have included very small numbers of female participants, there are currently no studies that address female laryngectomees’ experiences in their own words. This poster will discuss findings from a qualitative study exploring perspectives of female laryngectomees, with an emphasis on the application of these findings to our practice.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify critical factors in the experiences of female laryngectomy patients, discuss differences in the male and female laryngectomy perspective and apply these perspectives to intervention with female laryngectomees.

P 50 - The Impact of Technology on Language Development: A Systematic Review

Katelyn Johar, BS, Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Grace McConnell, PhD, CCC-SLP

This poster explores the results of six published articles with research conducted online to evaluate systematic reviews, surveys and experimental research. This review considers how technology impacts language development in children from birth to age 10. These studies considered the relationship between the use of television, electronic books and computers and the impact they have on a children’s receptive, expressive and pragmatic language skills. An electronic review of literature published between 1990-2017 found relevant studies published in peer-reviewed journals. The review found six studies related to the research question. Most about the studies of technology were limited due to lack of in depth research in the field. The review found that technology is not beneficial on its own in facilitating language and social learning development. For these technological methods to be most successful, adults and caregivers need to have a role in using the technology. Further research is needed to examine the impact of technology and its relationship on language and communication, especially with young children aged birth to ten.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify ways technology exposure impacts language in children aged birth to ten, distinguish what is the best method in order to use technology effectively with children to facilitate language learning and differentiate between the positive and negative techniques of three specific types of technology used with language development.

P 51 - Impact of PRT on Language Skills in Children With ASD

Rebecca Knepper, BA; Shyann Finley, BS, from Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Pamela Hart, PhD, CCC-SLP

While there are many interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), research is needed to identify which interventions produce the best outcomes. The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the research documented outcomes of the effectiveness of pivotal response therapy, applied behavior analysis, treatment as usual and the picture exchange communication system for individuals with ASDs. The methods in this study included systematically searching peer reviewed journal databases to identify studies in which individuals with ASDs received any of the above interventions along with documentation of language performance pre and post intervention. Seven studies were identified as the best available evidence to use for this review. The results indicated that using PRT as the primary intervention for individuals with ASD resulted in a more positive increase in overall language skills as compared to the other treatment approaches.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define PRT, identify implementation of other interventions used to treat individuals with ASDs and identify which intervention is the most successful.

P 52 - Benefits of LAMP Words for Life Support Group for Parents

Miranda (Randi) Prock, BS, Missouri State University
Supervisor: Lisa Proctor, PhD, CCC-SLP

University faculty and students in conjunction with a consultant from Prentke Romich Company provided parents of children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) with a family centered monthly support group. The monthly meetings were held over four months and provided information and activities on the use of LAMP WFL, an AAC software application. Parents, professionals and graduated students who participated in the groups were surveyed about their experiences. This poster will summarize literature on family perspectives and AAC and how the support group was developed. In addition, feedback obtained from the surveys as well as plans for continuation of the group will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to summarize the concerns and needs of parents of children who use AAC, describe steps taken to develop a support group for graduate students, professionals and parents who are AAC stakeholders and list factors that facilitate developing a successful support group for AAC stakeholders.

P 53 - History of Otitis Media and Impact on Auditory Processing and Academics

Jessica Rose, BA; Lindsey Branson, BS; Nicole Sisson, BS, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A

This poster will explore the effects of temporary conductive loss in childhood on auditory processing and academic success among college students.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe otitis media as inflammation of the middle ear, also known as an ear infection, recall auditory processing as is a natural process of taking in sound through the ear and having it travel to the language area of the brain to be interpreted and recall the procedures for the quick-speech-in-noise-test.

P 54 - Listen Up: Students With Hearing Loss Need Speech-Language Pathologists, Too

Madisen Breunig, Saint Louis University
Supervisor: Saneta Thurmon, MA, CCC-SLP

With early hearing detection intervention now mandatory in all 50 states, more infants are being diagnosed as deaf or hard of hearing than ever before. Advances in technology also prompt more parents to choose auditory-based language as a preferred language modality for their child, and in 2013, 88.8% of students with hearing loss attended a general educational setting. Because of this, many speech-language pathologists (SLP) working in educational settings will encounter children with hearing loss on their caseload. Few university programs offer specialty tracks involving children with hearing loss, and SLPs who have already completed their education often lack the training necessary to work with this population. To fill this gap in education, many resources are available to benefit SLPs and the service they provide to students with hearing loss. Interprofessional collaboration with audiologists and teachers of the deaf, as well as specific strategies designed for students with hearing loss will benefit both SLPs who are already certified, and future SLPs who are working to complete their education. As a community, professionals who work with students with hearing loss should work to provide a comprehensive body of resources to educate and prepare professionals to serve the increasing amount of students with hearing loss in their mainstream setting of choice.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify the need for SLPs who are equipped to work with students with hearing loss, describe professional and clinical strategies that benefit students with hearing loss and obtain resources useful for better serving students with hearing loss in mainstream educational settings.

P 55 - Negative Effects of School Disciplinary Actions With African-American Students

Taylor Edmond; Sarah Hussey, from University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Carlotta Kimble, PhD, CCC-SLP

Students who experience harsher disciplinary actions during school days often experience short term and long term effects throughout their lives. African-American students typically find themselves in more trouble than other students from different cultures. This is most commonly seen in middle and high school students. Disciplinary actions and policies are in the hands of administrators and other professionals who decide the consequences of students’ misbehavior. Harsh discipline, as well as neglecting the reasons for misbehavior within the school, can lead to an array of life-altering issues for African-American children. This poster will examine the real struggles African-American students face within schools. The purpose of this presentation is to increase awareness of the negative effects certain disciplinary actions have on African-American students, the life-long impact to African-American students and how these disciplinary actions contribute to the school-to-prison pipeline.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify disciplinary issues African-American students face within the school, state common difficulties African-American students face with peers, educators, administrators and other professionals, explain the short term and long term effects that disciplinary policies have on students and describe effective alternatives when it comes to consequences for students and their behaviors.

P 56 - Virtual AR: A Reverse-Flipped Classroom

Susan Fulton, Southeast Missouri University, PhD, CCC-A

This poster will discuss an innovative community engagement project conducted with students in an online college audiological rehabilitation course. Students were assigned to groups and prepared captioned presentations which were presented online. Community members with hearing loss, or those interested in learning more about hearing loss, attended the presentations in a classroom. Segments gleaned from the students' reflective essays will be presented. Community members graded each presentation on set metrics. Feedback from the community will also be presented. The value of community engagement in education will be discussed.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to discuss the value of community education regarding hearing loss, describe the benefit of community engagement and discuss the importance of AR services in the community.

P 57 - Overview of Telehealth in Speech-Language Pathology: What are the Benefits and Potential Drawbacks?

Kerri Potthoff, BS; Alyssa Welleymeyer, BS, from Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Grace McConnell, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-CL

The purpose of this poster is to explore telehealth and whether it is a viable method of therapy. Telehealth is simply using digital information and communication technologies, such as computers and mobile devices, to manage one’s health and well-being (Mayo Clinic, 2014). This systematic review looked at experimental, quasi experimental and other systematic reviews. The following databases were used to find studies related to telehealth in the field of speech-language pathology: ASHA Wire, EBSCOhost, PubMed and Academic Search Complete. Studies in which telepractice procedures were used in the assessment or treatment of individuals with a disorder or disability were reviewed. A handful of the reviewed studies compare the results of face-to-face intervention and telepractice. This systematic review suggests that telepractice is a viable method of service delivery for individuals from a variety of populations. However, further research is warranted.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe telehealth, explain what areas/disabilities that telepractice can be utilized and explain if telepractice is a viable method of treatment compared to face-to-face treatment.

P 58 - Recognition of Prosodic Features in a Non-Native Language

Haley Mills, BA; Ke-Hsin Lu, BA, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A

This research will investigate how listeners determine a speaker's position of power based only on the prosodic features of speech in an unfamiliar language (Russian). This study will determine if accurate judgments can be made about a speaker when nonverbal or language cues are not accessible. The information gathered during research will be used to investigate the ability of humans to analyze intonation, tempo, stress and other features of speech in an unfamiliar language.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to list three prosodic features of speech present in speech, identify acoustic variations present in different prosodic features and describe one way a person determines positions of power in communication.

P 59 - Relative Fundamental Frequency as a Marker of Vocal Fatigue

Melinda Pfeiffer, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Maria Dietrich, PhD

Vocal fatigue and vocal effort from increased laryngeal muscle tension is a risk factor for voice disorders in occupational voice users. Relative fundamental frequency (RFF) is an acoustic estimate for laryngeal tension (Steppet al., 2010). The aim of the study was to determine if RFF is a reliable marker for vocal fatigue in early career teachers.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define relative fundamental frequency, describe how to use relative fundamental frequency as an indicator of vocal fatigue and explain how relative fundamental frequency can be used in future research for a more objective measurement of vocal effort and vocal fatigue.

P 60 - Difficulties With Social Cognitive and Hearing Loss

Baleigh Proffer, BS; Deanna Hilton, BS; Tiffany Flax, BS, from Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Grace McConnell, PhD, CCC-SLP

This systematic review examined the pragmatic (social) abilities of children with hearing impairments and explored what intervention techniques are most effective.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to educate colleagues and speech-language pathologists about social cognition and hearing loss, recall several pieces of information taught by other presenters and perform poster presentations with confidence and strong take home message.

P 61 – Speech-Language Pathologists’ Training and Response to Identifying Suicidal Behaviors

Holli Meuschke, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Carlotta Kimble, PhD, CCC-SLP

Having a communication disorder limits how an individual conveys basic needs and how they interact with others. Research shows being the person with a communication disorder or their caregiver could lead to stress and even thoughts of suicide for either person. Determining suicide risk does not fall within the scope of practice for speech-language pathologists (SLP); however, they are mandated reporters when they suspect a client is at risk for suicide. This poster determined the level of training, skills and experiences SLPs have in identifying and responding to suicidal behaviors in clients and their caregivers. Participants were in pre-professional training or a practicing professional SLP. Sixty-six participants completed an online survey that was emailed to members of the Missouri Speech-Language-Hearing Association and posted on the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) community website. The survey included: demographics, knowledge and training, skills assessment, general attitudes and open-ended comments regarding any professional experience encountering clients or caregivers exhibiting suicidal behaviors. This study revealed 58% of participants have received some form of suicide awareness training, yet 96% reported wanting more. Participants were ambivalent regarding their skills and abilities to make a referral once suicide behaviors were identified, yet half of the participants revealed having experiences with suicidal clients and caregivers. Suicide awareness and prevention training is necessary for an SLP to make a confident and educated determination on whether their client or client’s caregiver expresses suicidal behaviors and to know how to respond.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe ASHA’s policy for practicing SLPs as mandated reporters of suicidal behaviors in their clients, identify the SLP employment settings and types of communication disorders that are impacted by client and caregiver suicidal behaviors and describe results relating to practicing SLPs’ confidence in training in suicide prevention.

P 62 - Stress Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

Lydia Lansford, BS, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Gregory Turner, PhD, CCC-SLP

Stress velopharyngeal insufficiency (SVPI) is a disorder in which air escapes or leaks through the nose rather than the oral cavity when playing a wind instrument, and not during speech tasks. In professional wind musicians, this poses a problem that could potentially end their career, as it can affect their ability to play their instrument and perform. Many musicians are not aware of this disorder, and therefore, do not know who to turn to fix their problem. Due to a lack of studies on VPI and the effect it has on musicians, treatment strategies for this disorder are mostly found in case reports. The various treatments for this disorder seen in case reports include: behavioral therapy, such as sucking exercises and a long warm up routine before playing of the instrument, lipoinjection augmentation in the soft palate, and finally, surgical correction of the velopharyngeal port. Deciding which method of treatment will be the best is determined first, by knowing if the velopharyngeal system works properly during speech sounds and can properly close when not under the intense stress of playing a wind instrument by viewing the velopharyngeal system prior to the client playing their instrument and viewing when the breakdown occurs in velopharyngeal function, the extent of the insufficiency of the velopharyngeal system, the client’s concerns and finally collaborating with an ENT to provide counseling on possible options of treatments.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define stress velopharyngeal insufficiency is and describe the different ways it can affect musicians, describe and define the different treatment techniques that are available to musicians who exhibit SVPI, describe the benefits for each treatment strategy for SVPI and analyze the considerations for selecting candidates for each treatment strategy.

P 63 - Students’ Perception of PWD After Involvement in Group Story-Generation Activities

Morgan Miller, BS, Missouri State University
Supervisor: Alana Monte-Kozlowski, PhD, CCC-SLP

This poster involved comparing speech-language pathology (SLP) students' perceptions of people with dementia (PWD) prior to and after activities with this population involving story-generation. A pre-survey was given to assess the students' perceptions prior to working with PWD. Then, the students were involved in facilitative story-generating with the adults with dementia. Student assisted the PWD by offering facilitative suggestion to assist them in adding to the group story-generating process. They also met 1:1 in discussions with the PWD after each story-generating poster. After five weeks, a post-survey was given relating to the student' perceptions. Changes in perception were assessed. To triangulate findings, a follow-up a focus-group was also conducted to confirm and expand on initial insights.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify students' perceptions of PWD prior to working with the population, differentiate between students perceptions prior to working with PWD and after working with PWD and identify strategies used by the students while working with PWD.

P 64 - The Association Between Television Viewing and Language Development

Marinda Fuller, BA, Rockhurst University
Supervisor: Grace McConnell, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this systematic review is to explore four questions: Does television viewing result in language delay during the sensitive period occurring between birth and approximately seven years of age? If so, how many hours of television watched per day may result in language delay? And, if so, is there a certain age span during the sensitive period that may leave children more vulnerable to language delay? Can television content mitigate these negative effects? Four relevant databases: academic search complete, PsycINFO, CINAHL and child development and adolescent studies, were searched using the key words (‘television’ OR ‘TV’ OR ‘screentime’ OR ‘screen time’) and (‘language development’ OR ‘language acquisition’) and (‘children’) to collect a comprehensive review of the literature, identifying 238 articles. Through inclusion and exclusion criteria, ten articles were included for review. Overall, results suggested that children from birth to two and half years old are at increased risk of language delay when watching over two hours of television per day. Children over four years old who watch over two to three hours of television per day may be at risk for decreased language skills, though not delayed.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to recall key findings to advocate for reduction of time spent watching television in very young children (birth-three years old), recall three pieces of evidence in order to inform other professionals about the relationship between time spent watching television and language delay in early childhood and recall confounding factors and limitations of the current research in order to critically discuss the findings with other professionals and parents.

P 65 - The Effects of Cognition on Health Literacy and Nutritional Intake

Erica Welter, BS; Ashley Welker, BS, from Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP

The occurrence of cognitive decline due to normal aging has been thoroughly documented in previous literature. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of cognition on health literacy skills and nutritional intake in adults, ages 65 and older. Data was collected from 98 community-dwelling older adults in the southeast Missouri region. The participants could not have been diagnosed with stroke, dementia or any other neurodegenerative condition for inclusion in the study. Multiple paper-pencil based standardized questionnaires and surveys were administered to each participant in one 45-minute poster. These included a case history form, health literacy questionnaire (HLQ) and the rapid geriatric assessment, which contained the rapid cognitive screen (RCS) and simplified nutritional assessment questionnaire (SNAQ). Though meaningful associations were noted among HLQ, RCS and SNAQ scores, the correlations were not significant at 0.05 level of significance. Level of education, age and gender were also analyzed. Conducting this study provided an opportunity to expand the existing literature on the effects of cognitive decline on health literacy and nutritional intake.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe how cognition impacts nutritional intake in older adults, describe the effect of cognitive status on health literacy and describe how education, age and gender predict health literacy, cognition and nutritional intake in older adults.

P 66 - The Effects of Phonological Awareness Intervention in Treatment of CAS

Christina Cejas, BA, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Laura O'Hara, PhD, CCC-SLP

Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) often results in both speech and language deficits. A wide array of treatments target motor planning to address speech concerns, but few treatments address the comorbid literacy deficits commonly seen in children with CAS. This poster will discuss the benefits of phonological awareness intervention, its efficacy in improving speech and language in children with CAS and its most constructive applications.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe the benefits of phonological awareness intervention in CAS treatment, appraise the efficacy of phonological awareness intervention in CAS treatment alone and in conjunction with other types of therapy and apply knowledge of phonological awareness intervention in effective treatment of CAS.

P 67 - The SLP’s Role in Serving Individuals who are Deaf

Courtney Simross, BA, Truman State University
Supervisor: Sheila Garlock, MA, CCC-SLP

The professional training of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) who serve the deaf and hard of hearing population has been designed by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and the Council on the Education of the Deaf. With improvements in technology and changing perceptions of individuals with hearing loss, SLPs’ education must continually be improved to meet the needs of this population. The purpose of this study is to examine the differences between how people who are deaf and hard of hearing wish to be perceived by the hearing population, and how SLPs are trained to provide services to those who are deaf. Data collection was completed November 30, 2017. One survey will be distributed to SLPs to examine their understanding of their role in serving individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing. Another survey was distributed to individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing to gather their experiences with specialized services, identity with disability and suggestions for the field of speech-language pathology. A methodology data triangulation was completed to determine the inconsistences between the survey answers of the two populations. The results of this research study was used to make suggestions to the field of speech-language pathology so that SLPs will be trained to serve and advocate for people who are deaf and hard of hearing in ways that best align with the needs and wants of that population.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify some of the most prevalent misconceptions that exist about individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing, implement multiple methods of advocacy for the deaf and hard of hearing population and make suggestions for the field of speech-language pathology to better serve the deaf and hard of hearing population.

P 68 - Thinking, Feeling and Speaking: Prosodic Patterns in Spanish-English Bilinguals

Whitley Bieser, BS, Southeast Missouri State University
Supervisor: Jayanti Ray, PhD, CCC-SLP

Variability in the prosody produced by coordinate bilingual speakers (Spanish-English) presents complex challenges most of the time based on varying levels of linguistic competence of the individuals. While speaking a non-dominant language, performance limitations may be noted that may interfere with lexical stress, intonation, vowel reduction, syllable lengthening and other concepts. Considering the coordinate bilinguals’ linguistic competence repositories, they may lack confidence while speaking the non-dominant language. Typically, performance limitations often mask the principles that operate in the bilingual’s competence repositories, relating to what bilinguals know and do not know about the phonology of one or both of their languages (Lipski, 2014). The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the salient prosodic patterns produced by Spanish-English (coordinate) bilingual adults. Five participants were recruited from university campus to provide speech samples consisting of a list of words, phrases, sentences and short paragraphs. For sketching client profiles, both demographic as well as linguistic competency-based information were obtained from each client using a questionnaire. The speech samples were analyzed, using various acoustic and perceptual markers. Results will be discussed in light of linguistic performance and competency domains.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe the prosodic patterns in Spanish-English bilingual adults, describe the main acoustic and perceptual markers of prosody in Spanish-English bilingual adults and identify the differences between prosodic competency and performance measures across various speech tasks.

P 69 - Vocal Cord Dysfunction Among Collegiate Athletes

Kylie Albrecht; Grayson Nickolaison, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Amy Teten, PhD, CCC-SLP

The purpose of this research focused on educating collegiate athletes on vocal dord dysfunction (VCD). VCD is often misdiagnosed as asthma and is commonly seen in young athletes. Three teams (wrestling, swimming and track) were assessed for short-term retention of an educational lesson about VCD. In addition, the long-term retention of the educational lesson was assessed approximately six months later. A pre-test was developed to test the current awareness of VCD versus asthma of individual athletes before the educational lesson was presented. A post-test was then given to recognize if further understanding of the topic of VCD was accomplished. Approximately six months later an identical test was given to establish if long-term retention of the information occurred.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define vocal cord dysfunction (VCD), identify the difference between VCD and asthma, describe the effectiveness of an educational lesson on collegiate athletes' knowledge of VCD and describe if athletes are able to retain their knowledge of VCD after six months post educational lesson.

P 70 - Impact of Prosodic Features on Students’ Likelihood to Answer Questions

Emily Hathhorn; Corrine Reeves, BS, from Truman State University
Supervisor: Ilene Elmlinger, AuD, CCC-A

The purpose of this poster is to investigate whether certain prosodic features of questions asked in class influenced communications disorders students’ perceptions of their likelihood to answer those questions. The researchers studied the impact of inflection, stress, volume and pausing on class participation.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to define prosodic features, describe how rate, inflection, stress, volume and pausing can be varied when asking questions, recall how specific prosodic features positively influenced students’ perceptions of their likelihood to answer questions in class and explain how the results from the study can be applied to the classroom and clinic settings.

P 71 - Evaluation and Treatment of Speech Disorders Associated with Cleft Palate

Megann Whitaker, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Anne Bedwinek, PhD, CCC-SLP

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Special Interest Group 5, speech science and orofacial disorders and the continuing education committee offers this poster as a practical review of assessment and management approaches for speech disorders associated with cleft palate and/or velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD). Evidence-based treatment and collaboration between the speech-langauge pathogist and the cleft palate team are emphasized.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify and describe the three types of velopharyngeal dysfunction (VP insufficiency, VP incompetency and VP mislearning), describe the obligatory speech features of VPD and differentiate these from compensatory articulation errors associated with VPD and describe three types of speech treatment strategies to address compensatory articulation errors in children with repaired cleft palate or VPD.

P 72 - Infants Development with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate

Briana Essington, BS, University of Central Missouri
Supervisor: Cheryl Needham-Rives, MS, CCC-SLP

Every year, thousands of parents experience the birth of a child born with cleft lip or cleft palate. Once these facial anomalies have been discovered, many parents feel confused or scared for their children; this is not the life they expected for their child. My poster will focus on educating parents with the essential information needed to understand their newborn’s health condition, to seek appropriate services and advocate for their child’s needs.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to identify possible etiologies for cleft lip and cleft palate development, explain surgical methods and approaches to care for infants and their caregivers, draw a conclusion of the grief process that parents who have a child with a cleft experience and identify providers and medical professionals who are on a cleft team.

P 73 - Recognizing Ethnic and Racial Disparities in Autism Identification in Schools

Abby Isabelle, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Ashleigh Ohmes Boyd, MS, CCC-SLP

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by repetitive behaviors and impairments in social communication (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Early diagnosis of ASD is critical because early intervention has the greatest positive impact on long-term outcomes (Turner et al., 2006). An early diagnosis may also qualify a child for timely special education services, likely resulting in improved academic outcomes (Henderson, 2011). Discrepancies in the age of ASD diagnosis between children of minority racial groups and caucasian children are well documented in health care, with caucasians often receiving earlier diagnoses (Mandell et al., 2009; Mandell et al., 2002). Because ASD may not be diagnosed in children from minority populations before the school-age years, school-based identification is critical for children to receive appropriate special education services. However, recent data suggest ethnic and racial disparities in autism identification are pervasive across school systems at a national level. Analyses of United States educational data has found school-based autism identification is more prevalent in caucasian students as compared to African American, Hispanic and American Indian/Alaskan Native students (Travers et al., 2014; Sullivan, 2013; Mandell et al., 2009). The purpose of this literature review is to improve awareness of the ethnic and racial disparities in autism identification in schools. Information from the review is intended to assist school speech-language pathologists as well as other educational professionals in identifying potential causes and gaps in knowledge contributing to disparities in autism identification. The information presented in this review may also be used to guide future research.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe ethnic and racial disparities in autism identification in schools, identify two areas in need of research regarding factors contributing to ethnic and racial disparities in autism identification in schools and list one potential strategy to improve school-based identification of autism in children from minority populations.

P 74 - Reviewing the Effectiveness of Early Intervention Programming for ASD

Kelsey Cahalan, BS, University of Missouri
Supervisor: Ashleigh Ohmes Boyd, MS, CCC-SLP

Parents are often informed that early intervention is beneficial for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Parents, however, often do not receive much information about which types of treatment approaches may be most effective for their child. Parents may benefit from information that directly compares treatment approaches. A systematic literature review will be conducted to provide a more thorough understanding of current treatment approaches that target acquisition of improved language skills and social skills in young children diagnosed with ASD. Three domains will be studied, including behavioral approaches, child-initiated approaches and parent-implemented approaches. The purpose of the current review is to provide information about similarities and differences between approaches and identify key principles as they relate to implementing early intervention for children with autism in order to help parents be more informed in making programming decisions with the early intervention team.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to describe the importance of early intervention in children with autism, specifically related to the development of language skills and social skills, compare and contrast methods of behavioral approaches, child-initiated approaches and parent-implemented approaches, summarize key principles as they relate to implementing early intervention programs for children with autism and be more effective communicators as a member of an early intervention team combining professional knowledge with family input in treatment planning.

P 75 - What is a Parent’s Role in Preterm Infant Feeding Development?

Cindy Stockman, BA, Fontbonne University
Supervisor: Carmen Russell, PhD, CCC-SLP

Feeding difficulties are common among preterm infants. For these infants, therapy often centers on the development of oral feeding skills, and parents can play an integral role in successful feeding mastery. Research supporting the role of parents in the development of feeding skills in preterm infants will be described. Approaches to intervention, which emphasize parental involvement, will be explained and the benefits of parental participation in treatment will be detailed.

Learner Outcomes: At the completion of this poster, the participants will be able to recognize the role of parents in the development of feeding skills in preterm infants, describe therapy approaches which emphasize parental involvement and outline the benefits of parental participation in treatment of preterm infant feeding difficulties.

 
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